Professor and Chair of Religious Studies selected as a National Endowment for the Humanities summer scholar

natalie

Natalie Kertes-Weaver, Professor and Chair of the Department of Religious Studies at Ursuline College, has been selected as an NEH Summer Scholar from a national applicant pool to attend one of 30 seminars and institutes supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities. The Endowment is a federal agency that, each summer, supports these enrichment opportunities at colleges, universities, and cultural institutions, so that faculty can work in collaboration and study with experts in humanities disciplines.

Kertes-Weaver will participate in a seminar or institute entitled “Representations of the ‘Other’: Jews in Medieval England.” The five-week program will be held at the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies (England) and directed by Professor Irven M. Resnick.

The twenty-five scholars selected to participate in the program each receive a stipend of $3900 to help cover their travel, study, and living expenses.

oxford

Topics for the 30 seminars and institutes offered for college and university teachers this summer include Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia: literature, the arts, and cinema since independence; American Maritime People; America’s East Central Europeans: migration and memory; arts, architecture, and devotional interaction in England, 1200–1600; black aesthetics and African diasporic culture; bridging national borders in North America; Dante’s Divine Comedy: poetry, philosophy, and the city of Florence; Daoist literature and history; George Herbert and Emily Dickinson; Jewish Buenos Aires; the Late Ottoman and Russian Empires: citizenship, belonging and difference; mapping nature across the Americas; the meanings of property; medieval political philosophy: Islamic, Jewish, and Christian; Mississippi in the national civil rights narrative; the Mongols, Eurasia, and global history; mortality: facing death in ancient Greece; performing Dickens: Oliver Twist and Great Expectations on page, stage, and screen; pictorial histories and myths: “graphic novels” of the Mixtecs and Aztecs; problems in the study of religion; reconsidering Flannery O’Connor; reform and renewal in medieval Rome; representations of the “other”: Jews in medieval England; Socrates; Tudor books and readers: 1485–1603; the federal government and the American West; the visual culture of the American Civil War; westward expansion and the Constitution in the early American republic; World War I and the arts; World War I in the Middle East.

The approximately 437 NEH Summer Scholars who participate in these programs of study will teach over 113,925 American students the following year.

 

Leave a Reply

Post Navigation