Author Archives: Allison Gall

Campus Celebrity: Tiffany Wallace

Our Campus Celebrity for the month of December is Tiffany Wallace, the director of student activities!

Tiffany Wallace

What is your favorite thing about being part of the Ursuline College community?

The students!!!!!!! It is incredible to see them learn, develop and grow through learning experiences in the classroom, campus activities and leadership opportunities

What is your favorite place on campus?

I would probably have to say Pilla not only because of the students, but because I enjoy the food!

What is one thing people might not know about you?

Let’s see… I do not like being called Tiff amongst my colleagues, but I do love to change the name of others. For example, my student worker’s name is Anna and I call her Anna Canna. I love it! I secretly think she does too. If you change my name to something besides Tiffany or Tiff I will definitely answer.

How does it feel to be nominated as a Campus Celebrity?

Such an honor. I wonder who did this? Someone selected me? Who, me? Not me!

If you could give one piece of advice to Ursuline students, what would it be?

Get Involved! Have Fun! Leave Your Legacy!

 

Know someone on campus that needs to be recognized for all they do? Nominate them as a Campus Celebrity using this form!

Community Weaving Project makes art accessible to everyone

Is there a better way to show the powerful benefits of art than to create a giant project that anyone and everyone can participate in?

Ursuline College’s undergraduate art therapy department did just that at the Founders’ Week Open House and for several days after, by setting up their first community weaving project. On the third floor of the Parker Hannifin Center, there was a large loom set up, with myriad different color strips of fabric woven through the strings. Nearby, a table sat covered in baskets of fabric strips and markers, waiting for the next passerby. Everyone was invited to take a strip of fabric, write down a hope, a dream, a wish or a prayer on it, and weave it into the colorful tapestry.

The objective of the project is to create a beautiful piece of community art – something that is accessible to everyone, to which anyone can contribute. The accessibility to the community is what makes this art special – it is a living, breathing piece that you can touch, manipulate, and change.

When chatting with the students of Jennifer Schwartz’s, MAAT, ATR-BC, Art Therapy 101 course as they participated in adding to the project, they all agreed that it made them feel like part of something bigger. Several students went on to add that weaving in a piece of fabric made them feel relaxed and peaceful.

“The hope is to have the project displayed either here on campus in the art therapy department or somewhere in the community that people can see it and be reminded that they are part of a bigger web. We had so many participants from both the campus and greater community, and we want everyone to be reminded of that,” said Schwartz.

 

Ursuline Student succeeds in Cleveland Clinic Mini-Case Competition

Renee Peoples Dennison pictured with her teammates and their coaches.

Renee Peoples Dennison, a senior in Ursuline College’s Breen School of Nursing, represented the College in the Clinic Solutions – Mini Case Competition, hosted by the Cleveland Clinic.

According to Peoples Dennison, the competition was comprised of five teams. Both undergraduate and graduate students served on each team. Peoples Dennison’s team included students from Cleveland State University, Ohio University and Kent State University.

The case for the competition was the integration of Akron General Hospital and its network into the Cleveland Clinic Healthcare System.

“As the only nursing student in my group, I was really able to bring some solid recommendations to the table,” said Peoples Dennison.

The competition consisted of two rounds of judging – one preliminary round and one final round in which the three final teams presented their plans to the President/CEO of Akron General Health System and other executive board members of the Cleveland Clinic via a live video stream.

Peoples Dennison said that her team was one of the three teams in the finals, and they won second place, which netted them $750 per undergraduate student or $900 per graduate student on the team.

“It was an amazing opportunity to network, innovate and collaborate with other students as well as influential members of the healthcare world. I felt confident as the only nursing student in my team. I encourage other Ursuline students to participate in this program,” Peoples Dennison said of the experience.

The Clinic Solutions program is hosted by the Cleveland Clinic’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion, with collaboration from the Cleveland Clinic’s Strategy Office, along with local minority professional organizations. Clinic Solutions is a think tank session for undergraduate and graduate/professional students, designed to foster innovation and the exchange of information on challenges and opportunities in healthcare. This competition is an opportunity for students from historically underrepresented racial and ethnic backgrounds to compete for scholarship dollars awarded at the end of two rounds of judged competition.

 

Campus Celebrity: Anna Schumm!

Welcome to our brand new feature: Campus Celebrity! Each month, we’ll be featuring a student or member of the faculty or staff as our Campus Celebrity on Voices and on our social media. Say hello to our very first Campus Celebrity: Anna Schumm!

Hometown: Findlay, Ohioanna schumm CC

Major: Fashion Design & Fashion Merchandising

Year: Second Year

What is your favorite place on campus?

I love spending time in the Student Affairs Center! It’s an uplifting environment and a great place to gain relationships with faculty members and students that pass through.

Which student organizations are you involved in?

I’m the treasurer for Programming Board, a Resident Assistant, a general member of Founder’s Week, and an assistant in the office of Student Activities.

What is one thing people might not know about you?

I am a connoisseur of bread. My personal favorite: butter flake rolls topped with poppy seeds. 

What is your favorite meal in the food court?

Mashed potato bowl. It makes me feel like I’m having a home-cooked meal!

How does it feel to be nominated as a Campus Celebrity?

Surprised! I am thankful that somebody took the time to recognize my efforts on campus. I’m appreciative of all of the people who help me on a daily basis whether it is a fellow classmate, professor, or faculty member.

If you could give one piece of advice to other Ursuline students, what would it be?

Get involved! This is the best way to meet new people, build your resume, and use your talents to become a part of the Ursuline community.

What do you love most about Ursuline?

Definitely the small class sizes! As a fashion major, it’s really valuable to have personal attention from professors as I work to tailor my craft. In a large classroom setting, I would not be able get the attention I’m able to get here at Ursuline.

 

To nominate someone as a future Campus Celebrity, fill out this form!

Sewing Her Way to the Top

Written by Hannah Barucky, junior fashion major

School is a big coDSC_5269mmitment. Suddenly, you’ve given up free time, brain space, and sleep to get assignments in on time. You’ve got to work harder, sacrifice money and energy, and be invested to do well. Is it worth it?

My decision to return to school after a two year hiatus was considered carefully and weighed against a lot of different factors. I had tested college for almost two years after high school and come out the other end with the only real difference showing in my bank account. When I discovered Ursuline and began to consider diving back into the undergraduate process, it was with a clear focus and shining goal at the other end.

As a fashion design major, I’m gaining completely invaluable knowledge that will carry me further into the world of entertainment: whether that means film, TV, or theater.

I plan to continue my work in an industry I’ve fallen in love with, but I can only do that through my training I gain every time I step on campus. I inadvertently fell for a future that is laden with uncertainties, each gig its own challenge, and every day choosing to jump off the next cliff. School is extremely important to prepare me to be ready to take those leaps.

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Being prepared for a competitive field gives me drive, and inspires me in every project I tackle in school. I attempt to see every little seam as a test of how I work under pressure, and each project as valuable pieces for my portfolio that can—and will—get me a foot in the right doors down the road, or whenever those opportunities come.

The Synod – Conclusion

Written by Rick Squier, UCAP student

     Our visit to the Synod was a once in a lifetime opportunity to witness how the church is attempting to reunite culture and doctrine. Reading the interviews of Cardinals and Bishops online, and then actually meeting some of them, and talking to them about their words was surreal. In addition to the prelates of the synod, Father and I were also introduced to authors, reporters, and theologians who are significant leaders in Catholic circles. All of the people we met, whether their position is to report for the church, or elect the successor of Peter, they were very gracious with their time and words.

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     As we heard varying points of view on how the church will recognize different relationships, it gives hope that there is an openness to those the various situations. Some bishops called for minimal change, while others were suggesting a significant shift from the way we recognize familial situations. Even though there isn’t consistency amongst all bishops, the fact that this Synod was formed to address issues of inclusion, shows that there is a genuine attempt to grow the church. This process gives hope for the future of the church and how it recognizes the message of Christ.

     Our Synod experience was only possible because of Bishop Murry’s invitation to spend time with him in the second week of the Synod. From unfettered access to areas of the St. Peter’s Basilica, and Vatican, to introductions to high-level decision makers of the church, this experience was only possible because of the bisjop of Youngstown . The entire experience was humbling as this Director of Faith Formation from a parish in Ohio, had the opportunity to meet leaders of the Catholic Church from around the world. Who knows what God has in store for us?

Synod on the Family, Part 2

By Rick Squier

Bishop Murry said that the Pope has been at all of the general sessions of the Synod, and was surprised in how approachable he is. He said the Pope attends the mid-session coffee breaks the same as everybody else. Bishop Murry said that several times he would be having coffee, look up, and there was the Pope wandering through the room. The image is one that the Bishop happily shared with us.

Bishop Murray and Pope Francis

Wednesday was certainly memorable. Father and I met Bishop Murry in the morning and got a private tour of St. Peter’s Basilica. It is an incredible place to wander through when it’s empty. We then celebrated Mass in the Clementine Chapel in the Necropolis, below the Basilica. The Clementine Chapel is the closest chapel to the burial chamber of St. Peter. The holiness of the space gave the prayers for our parish families a deeper emotional effect for me.

The Clementine Chapel

During a break at the Synod, Bishop Murry gave Father and I a tour of the North American Pontifical College. From the roof of the facility, we saw what must be the best view of Rome.
I can’t imagine having a better tour guide of any of the locations we visited.

Please pray for the Synod Fathers, and the direction they take the church

An Ursuline Student at the Synod of the Family

Rick Squier, a student in UCAP, is on a fabulous adventure to the Vatican this week as a guest of Father Ferraro, an attendee to the Synod of the Family. Follow along here as we get more information about his daily adventures. Here’s the first installment, from Monday, October 12:

After an uneventful, but very long flight to Rome, Father Ferraro and I found that our luggage ended up in Germany instead of Rome. Moments like this make you realize that the toothbrush and underwear in your luggage may have been a better choice for your carryon than the four bike magazines, and textbooks that you lugged through three airports. But, we are in Rome, and wearing the same clothes for more than two days means little in comparison to IMG_3658witnessing the potential that presents itself to the church with the Synod on the Family.

Monday was a spectacularly beautifully sunny day in Rome.  We saw Bishops from all over the world wandering around the Vatican area as we made our first pass through St. Peter Square. We met Bishop Murry, and in talking to him it is quite apparent why he was asked to be a Synod Father. He has such a wonderfully pastoral sense, and understanding about what it means to be a family, and the blessings and challenges that come with it. Bishop Murry addressed the synod on Saturday, in what they refer to as an intervention. The three minute intervention offers each of the 268 bishops of the Synod, an opportunity to present their view on the blessing and challenges for today’s families. Bishop Murry said that the text of his intervention will be posted on the diocesan website in the next couple days, when it is we will copy it onto our site (St. Joan of Arc Church, Streetsboro, OH) as well.

 

About the Synod on the Family: This meeting, formally called the Fourteenth Ordinary General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, is taking place in the Vatican from October 4, 2015 through October 25, 2015. This year, the Synod is focused on the vocation and mission of the family in both the Church and the world.

 

Education Classes at Ursuline – Teaching Life Skills and Leadership

Our major of the month for August is Education. To learn more about the Education Unit at Ursuline College, we interviewed the co-directors of the Education Unit, Dr. Mary Jo Cherry and Dr. Jim Connell. Cherry and Connell both shared valuable information about why being an education major at Ursuline is so special.

What are some things that you learn in an education class that help you for the rest of your life?

Jim Connell: I guess I would start by saying that you really do get in touch with who you are and who you are going to be. We emphasize that quite a bit – it is important, if you’re going to be an effective leader, to really know yourself. That’s just essential. You deepen the understanding of yourself so that you can be an effective leader.

Mary Jo Cherry: And I would say that’s probably similar in teacher education.

If you were talking to people that had a negative image of people in education or education majors in general, what would you want those people to know about education majors?

Mary Jo Cherry: I would say, speaking for undergrad, they are very dedicated and they want to work with kids. They are very hard working. A lot of our undergrad education majors are athletes, and a lot of them work full-time or part-time. You can’t be in this major and not be dedicated. They don’t get many electives, if any at all. It’s not for the faint of heart. These students, in addition to their coursework on campus, they’re out in the schools from their very first semester. As an example, the special education majors, before they even get to student teaching, have clocked a minimum of 365 additional hours. They’re really dedicated and they’re committed to doing what’s best for kids.

Jim Connell: I would go in a couple directions there also. Mary Jo ended with discussing hours. In both of our field courses, we exceed the minimum you see at some other institutions. If someone has a negative image, I’m not so sure that I can change that. But, what I can tell them is that the people who are in education operate out of a high sense of commitment and a strong sense of personal satisfaction from what they do. They really do enjoy it.

Mary Jo Cherry: The other thing I can mention is that our graduates see themselves in a profession, and they see themselves giving back as part of their professional responsibility. Our undergraduate advisory board has some of our undergrad graduates, but we also have educational administration graduates, who just happen to end up on our board because someone nominated them. They are absolutely wonderful. Educators are by and large a very committed group. They see themselves not only as working in the profession but also giving back. There’s a wonderful sense of community.

Any tips for current education students, future education majors, or recent graduates of Ursuline’s programs?

Mary Jo Cherry: I always say get as much experience around the children you want to teach as you can, so age level, developmental level. So for my students, I usually say it doesn’t matter what you do with them, just be sure you want to do this. Get as much experience as you can. The other thing I say is be willing to move where the jobs are. If you’re in a position to move, there are teaching jobs all over the country. I suggest that they be open to charter schools, private schools, parochial schools, and public schools, because you need to get your foot in the door and you need experience. If you’re always doing what you truly believe is the best for children, you won’t be hurting anybody.

Jim Connell: I think I would go a different way. I simply say to people that you want to look around and pick a program that has success and a network. We work to make sure people are in a place that they can get jobs, and we help them network at all times. Look for not just the beginning of the program, but the end.

Mary Jo Cherry: We really do work as much as possible with individuals, as opposed to a group of people in a class. The whole institution, not just our unit, not just our programs, walks the talk. We are really here for you, and you are not a number. There are at least three students who are currently in the educational administration graduate program that went through our teacher education undergraduate program.

I want the students to know a little bit more about you. What is your favorite part of teaching education classes?

Mary Jo Cherry: It’s the students I teach. That’s it. I love being with the students, and it’s energizing, it’s fun, and I just enjoy it.

Jim Connell: Mary Jo was talking about enthusiasm. I always present the Ralph Waldo Emerson quote “Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm.” I can be excited about teaching curriculum development, but it’s making the students enthusiastic about it that’s the key. It’s getting the students excited about what they’re learning.

Mary Jo Cherry: We do our administrative duties, but we only do it because we can still teach. I bring stickers, and pencils for every occasion. And I love sharing stories. I warn them that anything they say in class, I’ll have a story about it.

 

Two Years and Two Buildings Later

It’s hard to believe that July 20th marks two years since a tornado struck campus, causing damage to campus building rooftops, uprooting trees and destroying the College’s gymnasium. After many months of clean-up and planning, construction began on thtbt 2e Sr. Diana Stano Athletic Center. A modern structure, the new center will house the Seidman gymnasium, a fitness and training center and offices for the athletic staff. Not quite ready for occupancy just yet, the building will soon become the campus hub for returning and new Ursuline Arrows. They will likely be ecstatic about their new facilities spending much time over the past two years traveling for training and competition while the center was being built.

 

Much like the Arrows have done in successful competition, the Ursuline community rallied together to make the center a reality. The College community is grateful to those who have supported the construction through donations and those who have worked countless hours to make the architect’s drawings a reality.

 

In addition to the new Sr. Diana Stano Athletic Center, there was another building affected by the tornado. In fact, the new Parker Hannifin Center for the Creative and Healing Arts & Sciences was delayed in the construction process due to the tornado. Thankfully, the building is now almost complete, and will be ready for the Breen School of Nursing graduate students and the Counseling and Art Therapy students to begin classes there in the fall.