Category Archives: Students

Health Policy Intensive course focuses on homelessness

The Breen School of Nursing offered a new course for undergraduate students this year – titled the Health Policy Intensive (HPI). The course was available for Junior level nursing students. Unlike regular courses, this intensive began just after finals ended, and included adventures around Cleveland and in Washington, D.C.

Comprised of eight students and two faculty members, the group learned what homelessness is like here in Cleveland. The group specifically worked with Bellefaire JCB to discover what homeless youths experience. In addition, the pre-trip portion of the intensive also included learning about life at the Lakeside Men’s Shelter.

The class traveled to Washington, D.C. for a four-day whirlwind trip that covered a wide range of informational activities and meetings. On the first day, the group began the trip with a discussion on public policy and how it relates to homelessness. The group was also able to meet with two legislative aids to discuss some of the public policy issues relating to homelessness. One of the students on the trip, Rachel Jalowiec, said, “I was shocked at how people paid such little attention to homelessness. When we were talking to the congressmen, they were throwing out these ideas, and from what we’d learned, we knew that they would never work.”

The second day of the trip was a tour of Catholic Charities USA in Alexandria, VA, where the class met with a public policy analyst and a lobbyist from Catholic Charities over a lunch meeting. The third day of the trip got more hands-on, with the class taking a tour of the National Institute of Health. There, they met with representatives from the nursing department as well as toured various wards. This gave the students the opportunity to see the nursing end of healthcare for those in difficult situations. In addition, the group met with Brian Carome, one of the leaders of an organization called Street Sense, which puts out a bi-weekly newspaper written by and for homeless people. This organization also helps to give the homeless marketable skills and employment by helping them contract for graphic art and other similar projects.

The HPI group at Christ House in Washington, D.C.

The HPI group at Christ House in Washington, D.C.

The final day of the trip was the one that hit the hardest. The group of students went to Christ House, which according to Mary Lind Crowe, one of the faculty members on the trip, is “a men’s only facility that accepts and provides care for homeless people that have chronic and/or debilitating illness once they are discharged from the hospital.”

About the trip to Christ House, Jalowiec said, “That was my favorite part, because it was more emotional than I thought it was going to be. The people were so kind, and they’ve lived hard lives.”

When asked about why it is important for students that are looking to go into healthcare, and especially nursing, to learn about homelessness, Crowe said, “The concept of homelessness is very relevant for nursing – we could encounter these people every day in our job and not realize it unless we pay attention to details, like if the address they give is a homeless shelter. It’s also key to remember that medical bills are the leading cause of bankruptcy, and that being in our care means that they and/or their families see what their going through as a financial burden.”

Jalowiec said that the HPI experience really changed her perspective on homelessness and healthcare. She stated that she learned that “whether it be mental illness or drug addiction, it’s important for the homeless to get healthcare without being judged. One of the reasons that they end up waiting so long to get healthcare, besides not being able to afford it, is that they are afraid of being judged.” She added that, “there are so many stereotypes with the homeless, and hearing about their pasts really helped us learn not to judge them.”

The HPI trip definitely made a lasting impact on all of those involved. Jalowiec stated that although she’d always wanted to make a difference in the world, “this trip has gotten [me] to look into things more. On our way to Christ House, I was discussing everything with my professors, and we wondered if there were any similar programs in Cleveland. This trip made me want to get my degree and look into working for a program like Christ House after I graduate. This class made me want to make more of a difference.”

#AllWeWantforChristmasIsYou

Dancing Around College with an iPod – Christmas Edition from Maggie Stark on Vimeo.

The Admission Team would like to dedicate this song to all of our prospective students! Watching this video is sure to make you fall in love with UC students & bring some holiday cheer to your day!

Fashion’s visual display class students create Halloween windows

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Tradition. Sophomore nursing students take part in ‘Blessing of the Hands’ ceremony

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Every year sophomore nursing students take part in a traditional ceremony called the Blessing of the Hands. This blessing ceremony is a beautiful experience and valuable to students as they embark on their first clinical rotations. As a daughter of an Ursuline alumna, my mother, a registered nurse has learned through this experience to value the importance of empathy, compassion, strength and responsibility and has been guided by God to use her hands to heal those that suffer. Ursuline College, the only school in the region that holds this ceremony, wants this unique tradition to “touch the heart through the hands”. Through this ceremony, students will learn the importance of compassion and care toward patients and reflect on their upcoming responsibilities.

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#UCInstaLyfe: follow @UrsulineCollege on Instagram

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Thanks for following Ursuline’s #UCInstaLyfe story and its’ heroine Angie this past month! Angie, the reoccurring character, is inspired by Ursuline’s foundress St. Angela Merici. Angie represents qualities that all Ursuline students possess: strength, courage, ingenuity and determination. She represents you! We’ve had so much fun with this campaign and hope you have too. All illustrations are by Ginette Montoya. Check out the full instagrid below!

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Update: Google Glass

glassBy Maggie Stark ’14

During my time working for the College’s marketing department, I have had the incredible opportunity to discover cutting-edge technology through the Google Glass Explorer Program. Like all newly released gadgets, there is an inevitable need for developers to work out bugs. However, it was exciting for me to witness first-hand the progress of Google Glass over the past year while capturing moments from my senior year of college.

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Covergirl: Miss Student Nurse 1955

helen hardy2In the February 1957 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine, you will find a photo essay titled, “Student Nurse,” featuring St. John College alumna Helen Harding ’56 S.J. The lead reads: “Nursing isn’t glamorous or easy but Helen Harding learned in four years of giving baths, scrubbing wards, witnessing pain and death that she had met the challenge of her life. Here is the story of the rewarding career of a nurse.”

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Sneak peek >> Summer 2014 Issue

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#COMINGSOON Four Ursuline students spent their spring break volunteering with H.E.L.P. Malawi. Read about their experience in the upcoming Spring 2014 issue of VOICES Magazine.

Choosing Preservation: a major decision

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“Historic preservation was something I knew I could be passionate about and love working with.

By Sarah Rosso, Historic Preservation major

Choosing a college major is hard enough, but how would you feel if when you finally made your decision no one supported you? My friends and family were wary of my decision and probably would have been more accepting if I had chosen a more typical, “reliable” major like business or nursing. Your college education has nothing to do with your family members opinions and it is the first step to adulthood independence. The only person you should worry about liking your field of study is you. I chose to be a historic preservation major after years of evolving interests in high school.

Historic preservation was something I knew I could be passionate about and love working with, but I really knew little about it. However, that’s a chance you have to take when going to college. No matter how much you research schools, programs, careers, etc. there is no way of knowing what will be the best fit for you, and that’s ok! After my first year of college I have grown and changed a lot personally, so it only makes sense that students change their majors so commonly- because people change. Once you start taking classes it will be clearer to see what you like best, and if you find that you are in the wrong major, changing isn’t hard.

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Preservationists reading the cultural landscape

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What was originally the tallest building on Public Square?  What is NOW the tallest building on Public Square?  What does that suggest about the changing function of Public Square and the changing values of the community?

By Karl Brunjes, M.A. Candidate, Historic Preservation

For those of us who are interested in Historical Preservation, old things seem to catch our attention. Almost always it is a structure of some type. As a student, we are taught to look beyond just the structure or the area in which it is located. We need to see the structure in its environment and then break it down into parts. “Reading the cultural landscape” helps with understanding the nature of cities and neighborhoods and the changes that have occurred through the passage of time and the effects on the people that live there.

With the detailed architecture of the older buildings, they stand out from modern design. In some cases, you can see decades of architecture from building to building as you walk along city streets. Now you have your sense of place. Now that you know where you are, today’s technology will allow you to take the next step: A sense of time.

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