Tag Archives: Academics

Fannie Lou Hamer. Photo Credit: Google Images.

Voting can be a pain.

Many of you are eligible to vote in this upcoming election. Voting can be a pain. You might have to wake up early, drive to the polling place, find a place to park, go into the booth and see unknown names running for equally unknown offices. Furthermore what difference can one vote possibly make?

Maybe a broader context will help think about this voting idea. Fannie Lou Hamer, a civil right worker from Mississippi, participated in the so-called Mississippi Freedom Summer in 1964. She was arrested and beaten several times for trying to register black voters in Mississippi, many too scared to register because of feared reprisals by klan members.

Fannie Lou Hamer. Photo Credit: Google Images.

Fannie Lou Hamer. Photo Credit: Google Images.

Three young men (James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner), also involved in registering black voters in Mississippi, went missing and later found murdered–by klan members. One of the state’s senators, James Eastland, told President Lyndon Johnson that these men purposely went missing as part of a large publicity stunt to gain attention for their voter registration efforts.

Michael Schwerner, James Chaney and Andrew Goodman. Photo Credit: Google Images.

Michael Schwerner, James Chaney and Andrew Goodman. Photo Credit: Google Images.

Voting can be a pain – even the voter registration process.

Timothy K. Kinsella, Ph.D. is head of the History Department and Director of the Master of Liberal Arts Program at Ursuline College

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Reflections on France: Jewish-Christian Tour

Recently, twenty-three students, faculty, staff and friends of Ursuline College embarked on a Jewish-Christian tour of France. During their travels, the group experienced both the captivating atmosphere of France and the history of World War II. The experience in France left a lasting impression on everyone involved with the trip. Read their reflections below. To see more photos from their journey, click here

 

April Braden
The trip to France, namely Paris, was a dream come true for me.  I am named after the song “April in Paris”  and ironically, I was previously married to a man named Paris.  There were a number of enjoyable things that France offered from the Eiffel Tower, to Le Musee du Louvre, to the Seine Riverboat ride.  I would have to say that the opportunity to attend Claude Monet’s home and garden was my favorite.  The beauty of the variety of flowers and the aromatic scent that engulfed my sense of smell reminded me of the days spent with my grandmother looking at, selecting and planting multitudes of flowers every spring.  Although Claude Monet experienced problems with his sight in his latter years, the paintings that he created during the latter years were fabulous.  His ability to display an astounding creation on canvas, even with impaired eyesight, was not diminished, yet instead showed a God given talent that gave the world beauty and exquisite detail in many breathe taking works of art.

John
The trip to France this past Fall Break was one of the most amazing experiences I have ever had! The tour was truly unbelievable and I am so thankful for all of the different things we were able to experience.  It is hard to pin-point one thing on the trip that I liked the most, but Mont St. Michel and visiting the D-Day Beaches were on the top of my list. I am very thankful for Anne Lukas and everyone else that helped plan this trip!

Danielle
Thank you for the absolute amazing trip to France. It was a remarkable experience that I will never forget. I enjoyed each day of the journey. I have gained so much knowledge and saw unforgettable landmarks that many do not have the opportunity to experience. Although I loved every day’s planned events, my favorites were Mont St. Michel and Normandy.  I enjoyed staying at the hotel in the “village-like” town at Mont St. Michell. The food was exquisite and the view from my room was absolutely beautiful.  The beaches are astonishing. To be able to see the beaches, explore the bunkers, and stand on the battlefield is an honor. In addition, the museum in Normandy grabbed my attention and helped me gain insight of the war. This trip was by far the best experience I have ever had; and I am looking forward to the trip in 2015.

Gabrielle
Thank you so much for the wonderful trip to France. It was an amazing experience to visit the many places. Walking on the beaches of Normandy, and roaming through the bunkers that real soldiers used for shelter was an intriguing and fun-filled experience. I really hope to join you for your next trip to Italy and part of France.

Carol & Howard
This trip to France was a joy from beginning to end. We had a real welcome in Rouen from the kind and gracious University Hospital people. Mont St. Michel was storybook beautiful and a real treat. I think the best part was the day we spent in Normandy reliving D-Day. Our guide led us through the day with details about persons, places and events with great skill. I think I learned more about this piece of history in that one day than I did in my entire life. The cemetery visit was meaningful because of all we had learned before. Paris was Paris – busy, beautiful, full of history, wonderful food, music, shopping and memories!

Michael & Susie
Susan and I pooled all of our infrequent flier miles and joined the Ursuline trip to France. Random thoughts about our journey:

1) The French Government has made and I suspect will continue to make every effort to memorialize its positive track record during World War II. Not only did 75% of French Jewry survive the war, but there are more Jews living in France now than before the war. Most European Countries can’t make that claim.
2) Rouen was nearly left in ruin, but is thriving today.
3) If you want to pack in experiences throughout each day, Anne Lukas is the ticket.
4) No one on the trip knows the Ursuline fight song.
5) Because we walked at least five miles each day, I gained only two pounds in spite of eating more croissants than any other time in my life.

Je m’appelle Beurre Saltzman.

Holly and Riles 
What a fantastic journey! The program design was flawless and rich with history. Our tour guides were extremly knowledgeable, engaging and attended to every detail and accommodation needed. Every day’s activities were both educational and enlightening! We have gained such an appreciation for what happened in the past and brought us into the future. From the beautiful streets of Paris, to the breathtaking countryside of Normandy to the welcoming people of Rouen- we enjoyed it all. We also embraced the pain and suffering that people endured through such moving visits to the Internment camps and Shoah memorials- there are no words.

In particular, the best part of the entire trip were the members of our group! It was sincerely a privilege to have met such wonderful people who were all very caring and respectful to one another. Thanks to Anne’s vision and expertise, the trip far exceeded our expectations!

Pat Maskow Firem, Ph.D.
Our trip was an amazing combination of history, culture, spirituality, and health technology. Imagine climbing the stairs to a 1400 year old castle surrounded by water; climbing down into a 1200 Jewish yeshiva now underneath a courthouse, and walking on the very beaches on which our soldiers fought for a foothold during the WW II Normandy landings…all within a few days of each other. We participated in the liturgy in Notre Dame de Paris Cathedral, as well as in a bar mitzvah during a Sabbath service. The staff at the Rouen Hospital gave us a royal reception with hors d’ouvres that never seemed to end! All in all, we had the French experience of a lifetime. Thanks to Anne Lukas and all others who made this possible.

Nicole, Emma, Ashely at the airport

Art Therapy and Counseling faculty and students attend and present at National Conference

Faculty and Students from the Department of Art Therapy and Counseling attended The Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES) conference, entitled “Promoting Unity While Affirming ACES signDiversity” held October 16 – 20 in Denver, Colorado.

Early in the morning on October 16th at the Cleveland airport, my husband Jonathan Appel and I saw many familiar faces including counseling program faculty and students from other Ohio universities and colleges. The plane appeared full of Ohio counselor educators and counseling students, also on their way to the ACES conference in Denver (including one of our own PhD professors!)

Upon arrival, after three hours of headache, we were able to adjust to the Denver altitude. We reunited with the ATC program director, Gail Rule-Hoffman, completed registration, and reconnected with Korean doctoral students and faculty, whom we knew from prior counseling conferences. Opening reception was filled with familiar faces from all over the US and we could not wait to attend countless presentations including education sessions, roundtables discussions, and poster sessions.

On October 17th, Jonathan Appel, Ph.D. from Tiffin University, myself, and Gail Rule-Hoffman, Teaching Diversity presentation - DoHee Kim-Appel, Gail Rule-Hoffman, Jonathan AppelATC presented an education session, entitled “Teaching Diversity: Utilization of Experiential Learning Approaches.” The session was very successful, and we exchanged effective teaching tools with participants and received positive feedback. Dr. Appel and I presented a roundtable in the late afternoon entitled, “Walls and Bridges: Barriers and Opportunities for Effective Learning in Between Non-native Speaking and Native Speaking Educators and Students.” The session attracted many international doctoral students and faculty members and we were able to exchange research ideas and perspectives on being educated in United States.

On October 18th, we woke up with snow on the ground in Denver! The snow did melt quickly under the bright sun and blue skies– which lasted for the rest of the day. After completing the third presentation entitled “Similarities and Differences Between the United States and the South Korean GeriatricSimilarities and Differences - DoHee Kim-Appel Healthcare Systems: Implications for Counseling,” we decided to spend the evening with our friend and his family who live in Denver. Before the dinner, we toured the famous Red Rock Amphitheater which was built in 1910. Since then various famous musicians have performed there. It was overwhelming with such a rich musical history and wish we were able to hear some of them in live concert (The Beatles play there in 1965). Later that evening we were reunited with the ATC faculty Katherine Jackson, Ph.D. and three ATC graduate students; Emma Pitchford, Nicole Topp, and Ashley Tilberg— as they all were also presenting at the conference.

Dr. Jackson and her students also had the honor of an accepted presentation. Dr. Jackson wrote “on October 19th, we spoke on the benefits of having student service learning in graduate school curriculums, Dr. Jackson, Emma, Nicole, Ashleyusing our El Salvador trip as a template. We also gave a brief overview of “lessons learned” in El Salvador, and the students were able to illuminate the audience with their in-depth learning and growth as a counselor/art therapist in training. Not only did we present our experience in El Salvador, but we heard amazing lectures and met some famous people in the field of counseling, we also had a lot of fun walking around Denver exploring interesting boutiques and sampling some Denver cuisine.”

According to Ashley Tilberg, “I feel like I got a sense for the diversity within counseling fields. Emma Pitchford added, “I also learned what the trends are in the counseling field.” Nicole Topp stated “attending the conference helped with my professional development.” All of them mutually stated “it was a great way to spend our fall break and it motivated us to attend additional conferences. “We do love learning!!! Poster presentation was also the way to go for us because we were able to have meaningful conversations with participants.”

By the Sunday morning– we were all tired and ready to return home. Dr. Jackson and Gail Rule-Hoffman left in the morning and the rest of us headed to the airport after the morning sessions. After deplaning twice with four hour delay due to the mechanical problems, we arrived in Cleveland well after midnight. We all managed our frustration very well, “mindfulness exercise work!!!” I am glad we all returned safely.

DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D.is  Associate Professor for Art Therapy and Counseling at Ursuline College.

Walls and Bridges presentationEmily Dennis, Gail Rule-Hoffman, Emma Pitchford, Ashley Tilberg, Nicole Topp at the presidential openingDoHee Kim-Appel, Gail Rule-Hoffman, Katherine JacksonThe Red Rock Amphitheater

Nema Saleem & Ashley Tilberg

Art Therapy and Counseling faculty and students attend 2013 BATA Symposium

It was a beautiful Friday morning, feeling tired from the trip to England and on the road again to Columbus, Ohio to attend 32nd Annual Buckeye Art Therapy Association (BATA)                        (http://www.buckeyearttherapy.org/) symposium, titled “Art Therapy: Self-Expression and Healing”  held September 26, 27 and 28 in Columbus, Ohio. Sister Kathleen Burke, Gail Rule-Hoffman and Diane Meros attended entire symposium.

I was greeted by my classmates, Barbra Greenwood and Laura Malbasa, dkimappel 1from early 1990s when I was an art therapy student at Ursuline College. Reminiscing our time at Ursuline, all of sudden I forgot how tired I was. It was such a pleasant surprise to reunite with them and it was one of the meaningful highlights of the day. Proud to see our recent graduates presenting at the symposium with their colleagues and seeing our motivated current students participating in the symposium overwhelmed me with excitement. Most of the current BATA board members are Ursuline College ATC alumnie.

Sister Kathleen’s presentation “Grace, Creativity and Breakthrough: Saint Hildergard of Bingen” taught  me how her journey to establish art therapy department at Ursuline College was deeply inspired by Saint Hildergard (http://hildegard.org/).  Listening to “A feather on the Breath of God” (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jdVcKfAZJMU) during her presentation, I could not help feeling empowered and it was such an educational presentation.

The Art Therapy profession has many pioneers, and meeting Dr. Wadeson was such a joy. Harriet Wadeson Ph.D., ACSW, LCSW, ATR-BC, HLM who was a keynote speaker for the symposium and she has been called “a mother of the art therapy profession.” She has ways to use words to tell incredible stories with art and it is a gift. One of our ATC current students, Heidi Semijalac, was the winner of the BATA 2013 student scholarship award to attend the symposium. Seeing her smile and excitement to meet Dr. Wadeson was another highlight of the day.

dkimappel 5dkimappel 6Ashley Rogolsdkimappel 4Sr. Kathleen, Gail with Dr. WadesonHeidi Semijalac & Jody Pittner

dkimappel 3Nema Saleem & Ashley TilbergLisa Wood

The BATA conference contained my past and present path at the same place. I am glad I made it for the day!

DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D. is  Associate Professor for Art Therapy and Counseling at Ursuline College.

Abbey, Maggie, Danielle, Gabrielle , Danielle Lister-Sanchez and John Tonegato after the river boat cruise on the Seine River.

Photos from France: Jewish-Christian Tour

Currently, twenty-three students, faculty, staff and friends of Ursuline College are on a Jewish-Christian tour of France. Of the twenty-three travelers, eight are Jewish (five children of Holocaust survivors) and fifteen are Christian. Several have traveled before to Poland, Israel, Italy, France and Eastern Europe. You can follow the Ursuline College Jewish-Christian Tour of France through their photos.
photo credit: google images

Social Media Taking Over The Role of Publicist

What do you do when you’re a well-known media figure (with apparently no publicist or babysitter) and you accidentally post an embarrassing almost-nude photo of yourself all over the Internet? Well you delete it of course…only to realize that whatever ends up on the Internet will forever be immortalized, sorry Geraldo Rivera.

When Geraldo posted his nearly nude “selfie” on July 21, 2013 it seemed that nothing really had been done to his “image” as a media personality except for several –thousand- people criticizing his body and how creepy he was on Twitter. That was up until today when the story hit that his “selfie” had some unusual consequences in the form of cancelled events. That one photo was the reason that Duquesne University cancelled Geraldo’s appearance at the school due to the fact that the photo was “inappropriate and inconsistent” with the Catholic school’s values. Funny to think that a simple photo can ruin everything, but it sadly is true and it’s happening more than ever in today’s society of social media and instant gratification.

We are currently living in an age where everyone is acting as his or her own publicist in a way. Individuals  are creating versions of themselves on the World Wide Web and not thoroughly thinking about the consequences. It has even been said that when job hunting, employers will not only Google but look up their potential employees on Facebook as well as Twitter to see how they truly portray themselves. We all need to take a moment to step back and realize that we are venturing into the marketing realm for ourselves as a brand whether we would like to see it that way or not.

So why is Geraldo Rivera relevant to this? Because he is us! He is every person who has posted something whether in writing or in photo form on the Internet only to regret it and realize that there are no “take-backs” online. So next time we decide to post that photo of us having a wild drunk fun night, let’s step back and realize that today the biggest thing we are marketing is ourselves (which is a huge deal considering the job market –or rather lack thereof!) and only we can act as our own reps. Value yourself as a brand and human being. Keep some things private, mystery is good!

And all I can think is THIS GUY IS 70!? Perhaps it’s time to focus on other things Twitterverse…

Author Bio: Gabrielle Banzhaf is a designer, maker, mother, gardener and caretaker living in Lakewood, OH with her son and partner. She graduated from the Cleveland Institute of Art with a BFA in Fiber & Material Studies and is currently pursuing a BA from Ursuline College in Public Relations & Marketing Communications. She enjoys spending time on her porch swing, splashing around with her little one, working in her wood shop & obsessing over Game of Thrones.

Oxford group

The “Ohio Collective” Presents in Oxford, England!

After London, the time for the conference and presentation at Mansfield College (University of Oxford, Oxford, U.K.) finally arrived. The paper presentations would be based off joint research project which was developed between Ursuline College and Tiffin University. The research examined the relationships between creativity and mental health/mental illness. Members of the project team who presented in Oxford included UC professor, DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D., UC Art Therapy and Counseling graduate students, Claire Whiteman, Mary Cassidy, & Rebecca Stanic, Tiffin University professor Jonathan Appel, Ph.D., and undergraduate behavioral sciences student Erin Snapp.

Oxford proved to be a relaxed and calm setting in contrast to the helter skelter (Beatles pun intended!) of London.

Both my husband and I agreed that there can be no place more inspiring to an academic than Oxford. The pastoral settings among the ancient gothic architecture –left us truly breathless. Just strolling in the surroundings that once held Lewis Carroll, Aldous Huxley, Oscar Wilde, Percy Bysshe Shelley, J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, T. S. Eliot, John Wycliffe, John Wesley, Stephen Hawking, Edwin Hubble, as well as heads of state (26 British prime ministers have attended Oxford) gave us the momentary illusion of being more enlightened!

We even made sure we even visited the famous “Eagle and the Child” public house—which was a gathering place for “The Inklings,” which was an Oxford writers’ group that included C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, Charles Williams and Hugo Dyson. It is from here that the writers read and discussed various works, including their manuscripts.

University of Oxford!

Although its exact date of origin is not completely know, there is evidence of teaching as far back as 1096 making it the oldest university in the English-speaking world! The University of Oxford is actually over 30 or so semi-autonomous colleges, which made for quite a diversity of place. (http://www.ox.ac.uk/visitors_friends/visiting_the_university/index.html)

The conference itself was held on the beautiful campus of Mansfield College (The main building was designed by architect Basil Champneys, and built between 1887-1890. It houses the main college library, the law library and the theology library). One could not think a more perfect setting for an intentionally intimate conference (just 25 or so papers out of 100 submitted were accepted).

International and Inter-Disciplinary

The conference was sponsored by Inter-Disciplinary.Net, which is “a forum for the exchange and interaction of ideas, research and points of view that bear on a wide range of issues of concern and interest in the contemporary world”. The organization goals are to” promote and sponsor inter- and multi-disciplinary encounters by bringing people together from differing contexts, disciplines, professions, and vocations, with the aim to engender and nurture engagements that cross the boundaries of intellectual work.”  This group also hopes that its “projects, conferences and publishing activities are creative and novel, and they evolve constantly as we seek out and foster emergentdevelopments.” http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/  Dr. Rob Fisher is the Network Founder and Network Leader. His great vision is apparent through the well run experience.

Conference participants were educators and scholars from various countries including, Scotland, UK, Poland, Germany, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, New Zealand, South Africa, Montreal, Italy, and the United States. There were psychiatrists, clinical psychologists, a feminist art historian, a medicalanthropologist, a philosopher, an attorney, several literature professors, and several additional professionals.

There was a collective feeling among us that the conference organizers were achieving their goals, and we were very impressed with the design and intent of the conference. It was truly fantastic to have cross national and cross-disciplinary discussions. It was very gratifying to see all the students treated as peers by both the organizers and attendees. The ideas and discussion (both formal and informal) were some of the best professional experiences we ever had. Special appreciate goes to conference facilitator Gonzalo Araoz—for his wit and support. He stood as a shining role model for us and our students.

We (Dr. Dohee Kim-Appel and husband Dr. Jonathan Appel) on the first day presented a paper entitled: “Non-Rational States of Consciousness: Understanding and Counseling ‘Madness’.”

The research team (which came to be dubbed “The Ohio Collective” at the conference) jointly presented the paper, “Creativity, Critique, and Cutting Edge: Creativity and Madness.” Each member of the team took a research area of the topic and presented on it– and opened the topic for further discussion. All the students presented with skill and grace. As our students presented extremely well — Jonathan and I were elated. The experience confirmed the reason why we wanted to be educators. Feedback from the participants regarding our students was overwhelming. We all seem to recognize that learning comes in many forms. I was proud to be part of the “Ohio Collective” in Oxford!

The blog post was written by DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D. Associate Professor for Art Therapy and Counseling at Ursuline College. 

Fall is when we harvest Apples, right?

As consumers and citizens, we have witnessed the growth of American multinational behemoth Apple. From a tiny little computer company founded in 1976 in CA, their endeavors now include the Mac line of computers, iPod, iPad, iPhone, iTunes, iLife and iWork productivity suites, Safari web browser, and operating systems OS X and iOS. They are a major player in the IT industry, produce phones prodigiously, and are media store mavens online and off. Apple TV is a lukewarm hit and iWatch is coming. Each Autumn, we have come to expect the rollout of one new iPhone model. It was what people groaned over and wished for, saved for and relished. But this is 2013 and nothing is like it used to be.

As a student of Public Relations, though, I’m scratching my head. They must have the most proficient PR people in the business. What I’m seeing in their recent actions looks like a series of business moves, tactics, not a thought out market strategy. In the past week, Apple introduced a plastic cased iPhone 5c in many colors and the more expensive 5s which comes in three colors only but has a better camera, faster processor, and a fingerprint scanner. The 5c is under $100 if you buy the two year contract here in the U.S. but over $400 in the rest of the world. Apple is also planning a rollout of a new operating system at the end of the month.

So, we are harvesting lots of new ‘stuff’. But Apple’s main audience, loyal Apple product purchasers, have had to put up with a lot in the past few years. Apple has been a lifestyle brand, we want what they sell because it is the ‘cool’ stuff, the smart stuff. But increasingly, competitors like Samsung have other cool stuff! Apple consumers tend to lean left politically and are an educated lot. Apple is not the most environmentally friendly company, has been known to overlook labor indiscretions, has been in litigation over and again, and most recently one of its major suppliers was purchased by Koch Brothers, a huge donor to right wing political groups.

Has Apple stumbled this time? Their stock is down 5% today and market share is their mantra….time will tell. Is this the old wait and see strategy? Instead of jumping on the news programs, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Vine and all the other social media out there….are the PR folks at Apple sitting back to react once the dust clears? Well, played Apple…well played. Nothing new here.

– Laurene Medaglia

Author Bio: I am a lifelong resident of Cleveland, Ohio. Having grown up in Geauga county, I favor the ease of country life but love my diverse city. I am 51 years old, the mother of a 19 year old college sophmore, and live nearby in Lyndhurst. I began classes at UCAP in January 2013 to complete the degree I began working on immediately after high school, at the University of Pennsylvania. I work for Progressive Insurance in Mayfield as an agent and volunteer in our diversity and inclusion programs regularly. I have a red belt in Tae Kwon Do and have recently begun training in yoga. I look forward to obtaining my degree to help meet career goals at Progressive and satisfy my neverending desire to learn something new. I am an avid reader, gardener, and music fan.

After the Lecture: In the View of the Korean Mountains

After experiencing the hustle and bustle of Korean cities—it was now time for country-side travels. My husband and I first decided to venture to the Southwest part of South Korea. We took a surprisingly comfortable five-hour bus ride through the mountain-cradled picturesque country-side towards Haenam County, Jeonnam Province. Beside the natural beauty of the destination—we had made arrangements for a week-end “temple stay” at Daeheungsa Temple – a Buddhist Temple nestled within a remote national park. Daeheungsa is located on Duryun Mountain, in the southernmost area of Korea, and is the head temple for the 22nd District of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism. The exact date that the temple was founded is unknown, but historians are certain that the temple has stood since the Three-Kingdom period of ancient Korea (4th-9th centuries CE). The Temple Stay program is an educational and a cultural experience program designed to enhance the understanding of Korean spirituality and Korean culture. A typical temple stay program entails overnight stays at a Buddhist temple, and experiential participation in such Buddhist rituals as yebul (ceremonial service), chamseon (meditation), and barugongyang (monastic meal). We were given very comfortable living quarters (with traditional floor beddings) as well as traditional clothing. We had very welcoming and helpful guides, including much individual attention from the Head Education Monk. He provided many formal and informal discussions of Korean Buddhists’ life, culture, and spirituality. Possible future collaboration of Korean to English text translations even discussed.

After the temple stay, we also made arrangements to stay nearby at what has been described as one of the “first” Korean “Inns”. This “Inn” was nothing like what we think of in America as an Inn. In Korea, these overnight places are called a “Yeogwan”.  Yeogwans are a traditional Korean housing structure, with heated floors and in this case a stunning natural view. Traditional Korean meals are also served for a low fee. We enjoyed a delicious dinner of fresh fish and vegetables with a scenic view of the mountains. Nothing could have been a more perfect way to end this country side-trip.

Later, after returning to Seoul, we also did a day tour to the DMZ in the Northern-most part of South Korea.  The DMZ area is near the border of North Korea and is a place of great contradictions. It is a very peaceful and an exquisite natural area of a renewed nature preserve. Since no large structures–urban or military are allowed there—it has abundant natural and wild life. Many animal and plant species– once nearly extinct —have returned in this quiet undisturbed setting. But in this beautiful stillness there are also signs of great tensions. There are many Army checkpoints, restrictions, and watchful armed observations by military soldiers. As we ventured our glances into the vast distance mountains of North Korea—one can’t help but feel the pain of past losses and pray for a future peace.

The blog post was written by DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D. Associate Professor for Art Therapy and Counseling at Ursuline College.

After the Lecture: The City Life in Korea

Given that my family lives in Seoul, South Korea—we had much time to explore the city. Seoul is the capital and largest metropolis of South Korea. A megacity with a population of more than 10 million, it is one of the largest cities in the developed world.  The Seoul Capital Area, which includes the surrounding Incheon metropolis and Gyeonggi province, is the world’s second largest metropolitan area with over 25.6 million people, and is home to over half of South Koreans along with 632,000 international residents [1].  Situated on the Han River, Seoul’s history stretches back more than 2,000 years when it was founded in 18 BC by Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. It continued as the capital of South Korea under the Joseon Dynasty and the Korean Empire. The Seoul metropolitan area contains four UNESCO World Heritage Sites: Changdeok Palace, Hwaseong Fortress, Jongmyo Shrine and the Royal Tombs of the Joseon Dynasty. Seoul is surrounded by mountains, the tallest being Mt. Bukhan, the world’s most visited national park [2].

We were able to venture many of my old haunts as well as some new corners of this extensive (and continually updated) immense city. One of the highlights was an evening boat tour along the Han River—which flows through the center of the city. The view offered from the river was a stunning and shimmering panorama of one of the world’s most vibrant cities. The experience was animated with the sights of colors, the sounds of laughter, and the smells of Korean barbecues. No city seems more alive than Seoul in the summer.

We also had a chance to spend a day in the Southern Port city of Busan.  Busan is South Korea’s second largest metropolis after Seoul, with a population of approximately 3.6 million [3]. The Metropolitan area (includes adjacent cities of Gimhae and Yangsan) has a population of over 4.5 million, and when including nearby Ulsan, and the South Gyeongsang region—the area has over 8 million population in the metropolitan area [4]. The area also has Korea’s largest beach and Korea’s longest river, the Nakdong River. Busan is the largest port city in South Korea and the world’s fifth busiest seaports.  Busan also offers one the world’s best seafood markets, and includes many Korean fish favorites of all types. We also got to experience the ocean shoreline vistas from atop an open air bus, and we sampled the Korean street sweet treats in the bustling shopping district. From Busan we able to rapidly travel back to Seoul via one of the world’s fastest “bullet trains.” City Life is Korea holds many charms.

  1. http://kosis.kr/abroad/abroad_01List.jsp?parentId=A
  2. http://english.visitkorea.or.kr/enu/SI/SI_EN_3_1_1_1.jsp?cid=264309
  3. http://english.busan.go.kr/01_about/03_02.jsp
  4. http://www.busan.go.kr/library/03statistics/01_01.jsp?pageNo=1&search_type=02&groupid=00080_/00001&year=2013&category_gubun=%ED%86%B5%EA%B3%84%EC%9E%90%EB%A3%8C%EC%8B%A4&command=view&strSN=116

The blog post was written by DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D. Associate Professor for Art Therapy and Counseling at Ursuline College.