Tag Archives: Blog

Fridays with B&B: relishing in all things Cleveland, part one

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A weekly conversation between your campus Marketing gals Brittney & Becca. TGIF! 

After taking a “Good Friday” break last week, we are talking Cleveland: Why Becca loves her hometown and how Britt is growing to feel the same about her new home. We had the opportunity to grab lunch in Ohio City with the blogger behind I Heart Cleveland, Charity D’Amato –  aka, a fabulous resource for all things Cleveland! Below is the first installment of our two-part series featuring Charity. Part two to come soon!

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2013 AOCC group pix

Art Therapy and Counseling (ATC) Faculty and Students Co-present at the All Ohio Counselors Conference

It was a histo2013 AOCC blog pptrical day for the art therapy and counseling faculty and students! It was the first time for us to present together at the All Ohio Counselors Conference in Columbus, Ohio. This took place on November 7, 2013. Presenters included two current ATC graduate students, Claire Whiteman, Mary Cassidy, and ATC alumni Steve Macek, M.A., an art therapist and professional counselor at University Hospital of Cleveland. Also presenting were ATC faculty Katherine Jackson, Ph.D. and myself (DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D)–along with Jonathan Appel, Ph.D., Associate Professor in the Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences at Tiffin University (TU) and TU student Erin Snapp.

Our joint research team presented empirical results of a year-long research project that 2013 AOCC group pixhas been investigating links between creativity and mental health. The title of the presentation was “The Relationship Between Measures of Creativity and Mental Health Measures.”

The aim of the study presented was to determine the extent to which multidimensional mental health measures predict measures of creativity as assessed by a measure of creative personality and an inventory of creative behaviors. The study also examined the interrelationships between mental health, personality measures, demographic variables, and measures of creativity. The research found that overall better mental health (emotional stability and low psychoticism, low autistic tendencies) appears associated with creative personality, but increased levels of anxiety, obsessive compulsive and somatization were associated with actual creative activity. Another major finding of the study was that there was a strong association between the mental health symptom measure of somatization and creativity across measures of creativity. Implications of this research for counseling and psychotherapy were also discussed at the presentation. The research strongly suggested that expressive therapies can and should be integrated within a clinical counseling practice. The research team is currently preparing the research for publication.

I appreciated Gail Rule-Hoffman’s (ATC program director) supportive attendance and her leadership throughout the conference.

DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D.is Associate Professor for Art Therapy and Counseling at Ursuline College.

Nema Saleem & Ashley Tilberg

Art Therapy and Counseling faculty and students attend 2013 BATA Symposium

It was a beautiful Friday morning, feeling tired from the trip to England and on the road again to Columbus, Ohio to attend 32nd Annual Buckeye Art Therapy Association (BATA)                        (http://www.buckeyearttherapy.org/) symposium, titled “Art Therapy: Self-Expression and Healing”  held September 26, 27 and 28 in Columbus, Ohio. Sister Kathleen Burke, Gail Rule-Hoffman and Diane Meros attended entire symposium.

I was greeted by my classmates, Barbra Greenwood and Laura Malbasa, dkimappel 1from early 1990s when I was an art therapy student at Ursuline College. Reminiscing our time at Ursuline, all of sudden I forgot how tired I was. It was such a pleasant surprise to reunite with them and it was one of the meaningful highlights of the day. Proud to see our recent graduates presenting at the symposium with their colleagues and seeing our motivated current students participating in the symposium overwhelmed me with excitement. Most of the current BATA board members are Ursuline College ATC alumnie.

Sister Kathleen’s presentation “Grace, Creativity and Breakthrough: Saint Hildergard of Bingen” taught  me how her journey to establish art therapy department at Ursuline College was deeply inspired by Saint Hildergard (http://hildegard.org/).  Listening to “A feather on the Breath of God” (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jdVcKfAZJMU) during her presentation, I could not help feeling empowered and it was such an educational presentation.

The Art Therapy profession has many pioneers, and meeting Dr. Wadeson was such a joy. Harriet Wadeson Ph.D., ACSW, LCSW, ATR-BC, HLM who was a keynote speaker for the symposium and she has been called “a mother of the art therapy profession.” She has ways to use words to tell incredible stories with art and it is a gift. One of our ATC current students, Heidi Semijalac, was the winner of the BATA 2013 student scholarship award to attend the symposium. Seeing her smile and excitement to meet Dr. Wadeson was another highlight of the day.

dkimappel 5dkimappel 6Ashley Rogolsdkimappel 4Sr. Kathleen, Gail with Dr. WadesonHeidi Semijalac & Jody Pittner

dkimappel 3Nema Saleem & Ashley TilbergLisa Wood

The BATA conference contained my past and present path at the same place. I am glad I made it for the day!

DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D. is  Associate Professor for Art Therapy and Counseling at Ursuline College.

Butta’s Blog: It has begun!

It has begun!

The Ursuline College swimming and diving team is in the water and working hard! After mapping out a running course on campus and sweating for two weeks, we started in the water last Monday at Gilmour Academy.

So far, spirits have been high as we are excited to start training and gain some strength and endurance in the pool. Unfortunately, this is all done at 6:00 a.m.! Until Hathaway Brown School finishes its renovations, the Arrows are at GA each morning at 6:00 before class and on campus doing dry-land training at 3:30 p.m.

Although the yardage is not topping the charts just yet, our practices have consisted of breath control, stroke technique drills and basically shaking off the dust from summer break. Looking at the weeks ahead, we plan on continuing to train as hard as we can to prepare ourselves for our first meet which is just four weeks away!

Coach Katz has been doing his best to give us every opportunity to work and believe me, we are being creative in our training! It is easy to get frustrated with the traveling, early mornings and schedule changes but we are not letting it consume us. We have high hopes this is going to make us a better, stronger and more competitive team. From what we hear, our new weight room in Daley will be available this week so that is yet another resource to add.

I can’t forget classes, though! Exams have also kicked in and time management skills have truly been put to the test. On our team, we have found the upperclassmen giving the newcomers some pointers in relation to professors, study habits and time management, as being a student-athlete can be difficult at times. The swim team has some extremely talented and smart girls and I am very proud of all of them.

So, we will continue to jump in that cold water at 6:00 a.m. and do what we love: work towards our goals both in the water and in the classroom. It’s going to be quite a year, everyone!

Can’t wait to keep you all updated and brag about the URSULINE COLLEGE SWIMMING AND DIVING TEAM!

Go Arrows!

Allie Butta, Ursuline ’14
Captain of the 2013-14 UC swimming and diving team

Butta’s Blog Archive
Post One (Sep. 3, 2013)

After the Lecture: Damage From the Wind

When I teach Calculus, I teach a section in which the area between two functions is calculated. Later, the volume between two three dimensional shapes is calculated using similar techniques. For example, one might take a cube and imagine the volume left if the shape if an ice cream “scoop” of a spherical shape is removed from one side of that cube. I found myself thinking of this particular problem last weekend when I looked at photographs of what had been, until last weekend, the gym at Ursuline College.

After a week of oppressive heat, a storm blew through our part of Ohio last weekend, bringing strong wind and heavy rain that flooded many basements on our street. As I reminded myself of the benefits of not having an actual basement in my split-level home, I discovered an e-mail from my dean talking about wind damage that was found throughout campus, damage that had blown off a wall of our gym. With images of branches blown around our own back yard, I assumed that there were such branches strewn about the campus, and that the problem could be taken care of by a few workers who would pick up the branches quickly and repair a wall to the gym, which I assumed was simply an outer façade that had been torn off. It was not until I received another note from her later that day talking about classes being cancelled for the weekend that I began to suspect that things were worse than I had imagined. But even that did not prepare me for the images on the nightly news of the damage that had been done to the campus by a tornado that had touched down in the midst of the storm. The wall that was torn from the gym was not an outer façade, but an entire wall that had crumbled after part of the roof had been lifted by the wind. The hardwood floors were open to the sun and rain, and basketball hoops swung in the wind. Much of the roof was gone, and what was left of the walls on either side of the gym looked like they had been damaged by a bomb.

Immediately after showing pictures of our idyllic campus contrasted with the damage done by the tornado, the news showed an interview with our president, Sister Diana Stano, who said the only good thing that could be said; “no one was injured.” It was amazing to realize that all that damage had been done and no one was hurt. Indeed, many of the college’s neighbors who had been touched by the tornado had escaped with less damage than could have occurred. Huge trees had been uprooted, but none of them harmed anyone in the homes they had stood near, and property damage was much less than one would have expected. Referring to our Roman Catholic roots, one woman on the news even said that she felt that the tornado had “picked up a prayer at Ursuline.” that had protected the neighborhood.

This was the first tornado that my daughter has had any direct personal knowledge of, and she was scared to hear that a tornado had struck so close to her own home. I cringed when I remembered that we told her only a few weeks ago that the tornados in Oklahoma were far away, and that she was safe here. Alas, she is starting to really realize that such promises made by her parents are not promises that can be kept. Scary things happen everywhere, and as she grows, she will become more aware of this truth.

As I have found myself doing many times in her short life, I held her extra tight that night when I wished her good night, and once again wished that I could protect her from all that is bad and scary in the world. As I did, I thought of the other parents whose children had not been so lucky; the parents of the children in a movie theatre in Aurora, Colorado, and those who sent their healthy children to school one day in Chardon, Ohio and in Newtown, Connecticut. And yes, I was reminded of the parents of Tryvon Martin in Florida, whose child would never come get to come home. I am once again reminded that, in parenting, there are many things beyond my control, and that there are limits to the degree that I can protect my daughter from all of the scary things that blow thorough this world.

This blog post was written by Rosemarie Emanuele, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics at Ursuline College.

Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/mama-phd/math-geek-mom-damage-wind#ixzz2bC3qktFo
Inside Higher Ed

A Renewed Spirit of Possibilities

The conference is proving to be very successful. We met, Jung-Ae Ko, who is the Director of Korean Spirit and Culture Project. She gave an outstanding presentation on Korean History and Culture and was even kind enough to donate to Ursuline College a set of books on Korean History and Culture. Our presentations of research went very well (I co-presented with my husband Dr. Jonathan Appel as well).

It was very nice to meet and talk with researchers from all over the world. We attended many research presentations and we had much time for cultural and professional exchanges. We also went on a tour of community centers geared towards serving Korean olders (which is a term I learned here).

I met a Korean Art Therapist, who works with the elderly—and got to see an Art Therapy program in action. Possibilities for cross-cultural exchanges discussed! Sights of Seoul demonstrate juxtaposition of ancient culture and emerging technological future—which was also highlighted in the theme of the World Congress of Gerontology and Geriatrics (Digital Ageing: A New Horizon for Health Care and Active Ageing).

Feeling a renewed spirit for the possibilities glimpsed here.

This blog post was written by DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D. Associate Professor for Art Therapy and Counseling at Ursuline College.

DoHee also recently blogged for The Huffington Post’s “Ted Weekends.” To read her post, click here.