Tag Archives: Faculty

Education Classes at Ursuline – Teaching Life Skills and Leadership

Our major of the month for August is Education. To learn more about the Education Unit at Ursuline College, we interviewed the co-directors of the Education Unit, Dr. Mary Jo Cherry and Dr. Jim Connell. Cherry and Connell both shared valuable information about why being an education major at Ursuline is so special.

What are some things that you learn in an education class that help you for the rest of your life?

Jim Connell: I guess I would start by saying that you really do get in touch with who you are and who you are going to be. We emphasize that quite a bit – it is important, if you’re going to be an effective leader, to really know yourself. That’s just essential. You deepen the understanding of yourself so that you can be an effective leader.

Mary Jo Cherry: And I would say that’s probably similar in teacher education.

If you were talking to people that had a negative image of people in education or education majors in general, what would you want those people to know about education majors?

Mary Jo Cherry: I would say, speaking for undergrad, they are very dedicated and they want to work with kids. They are very hard working. A lot of our undergrad education majors are athletes, and a lot of them work full-time or part-time. You can’t be in this major and not be dedicated. They don’t get many electives, if any at all. It’s not for the faint of heart. These students, in addition to their coursework on campus, they’re out in the schools from their very first semester. As an example, the special education majors, before they even get to student teaching, have clocked a minimum of 365 additional hours. They’re really dedicated and they’re committed to doing what’s best for kids.

Jim Connell: I would go in a couple directions there also. Mary Jo ended with discussing hours. In both of our field courses, we exceed the minimum you see at some other institutions. If someone has a negative image, I’m not so sure that I can change that. But, what I can tell them is that the people who are in education operate out of a high sense of commitment and a strong sense of personal satisfaction from what they do. They really do enjoy it.

Mary Jo Cherry: The other thing I can mention is that our graduates see themselves in a profession, and they see themselves giving back as part of their professional responsibility. Our undergraduate advisory board has some of our undergrad graduates, but we also have educational administration graduates, who just happen to end up on our board because someone nominated them. They are absolutely wonderful. Educators are by and large a very committed group. They see themselves not only as working in the profession but also giving back. There’s a wonderful sense of community.

Any tips for current education students, future education majors, or recent graduates of Ursuline’s programs?

Mary Jo Cherry: I always say get as much experience around the children you want to teach as you can, so age level, developmental level. So for my students, I usually say it doesn’t matter what you do with them, just be sure you want to do this. Get as much experience as you can. The other thing I say is be willing to move where the jobs are. If you’re in a position to move, there are teaching jobs all over the country. I suggest that they be open to charter schools, private schools, parochial schools, and public schools, because you need to get your foot in the door and you need experience. If you’re always doing what you truly believe is the best for children, you won’t be hurting anybody.

Jim Connell: I think I would go a different way. I simply say to people that you want to look around and pick a program that has success and a network. We work to make sure people are in a place that they can get jobs, and we help them network at all times. Look for not just the beginning of the program, but the end.

Mary Jo Cherry: We really do work as much as possible with individuals, as opposed to a group of people in a class. The whole institution, not just our unit, not just our programs, walks the talk. We are really here for you, and you are not a number. There are at least three students who are currently in the educational administration graduate program that went through our teacher education undergraduate program.

I want the students to know a little bit more about you. What is your favorite part of teaching education classes?

Mary Jo Cherry: It’s the students I teach. That’s it. I love being with the students, and it’s energizing, it’s fun, and I just enjoy it.

Jim Connell: Mary Jo was talking about enthusiasm. I always present the Ralph Waldo Emerson quote “Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm.” I can be excited about teaching curriculum development, but it’s making the students enthusiastic about it that’s the key. It’s getting the students excited about what they’re learning.

Mary Jo Cherry: We do our administrative duties, but we only do it because we can still teach. I bring stickers, and pencils for every occasion. And I love sharing stories. I warn them that anything they say in class, I’ll have a story about it.

 

Ursuline College’s Eastern Bluebird Trail

Written by Sarah Preston, interim dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Summertime is a quiet time here on campus with many of the students and faculty away for summer break, but it’s also a time bursting with new life, bird life. June and July have produced many Mallard ducklings dabbling in Lake Elissa and a family of KilPhoto 1ldeer chicks running around on their too-long legs. Multiple broods of Tree Swallows and Eastern Bluebirds have hatched and fledged from the nest boxes placed all over campus last year by the Ornithology class.

It all began when my chemistry colleague, Mary Kay Deley, and I decided to take Glenn Hanniford’s Ornithology course for fun in spring 2014. Mary Kay has her own bluebird nest boxes in her yard and has been a volunteer bluebird trail monitor for the Holden Arboretum. She recognized Ursuline’s campus, with its expanses of short grass bordered by wooded areas, as perfect Eastern Bluebird habitat and suggested that we create our own bluebird trail.

The project became a collaboration between the biology department, chemistry department, and facilities and maintenance. One of the lab periods was used to build the nest boxes. Wally Bursic, from maintenance, cut the wood, provided the power tools, and assisted with assembly. Each of the 18 students in the course had the opportunity to build her own bluebird nest box and we proudly put our names on them.

We placed 14 nest boxes in pairs around the campus and eagerly waited to see who would move into them. After the students leave for the summer, the boxes are monitored by Ursuline faculty and staff volunteers who remove the nests of the non-native, invasive House Sparrows to keep their population in check and record species, number of eggs and young, and approximate age of the young for each nest box.

DSC_0206It’s exciting to monitor the nest boxes because you never know what you’re going to find when you open the box. Sometimes it’s empty. Occasionally a messy House Sparrow nest needs to be removed. Often it contains the Tree Swallow eggs or young and the parents will protect the nest, swooping down on the monitor causing her to don the ridiculous umbrella hat. A few nest boxes contain the stick nests of House Wrens, which for some reason include hairy, black spiders, which have been known to make a monitor (who shall remain nameless) scream. Every now and then we open a box and find what we’ve been hoping for, the pale blue eggs of the Eastern Bluebird in a neat nest of pine needles, and we rejoice.

Although most of our nest boxes have been occupied by other beneficial species, we have had moderate success attracting Eastern Bluebirds to our boxes. Last year one nest box, #9, successfully produced 4 Eastern Bluebird fledglings. This summer that same box had another brood of four, most likely produced by the same pair of bluebirds since they are known to return year after year to the same nesting site. With the donation of additional boxes this year, we placed six more boxes in three new locations. It was one of these new boxes that housed a second bluebird family this year; they fledged three chicks within the past two weeks and just laid two more eggs, which, if they successfully hatch and fledge, will bring our Eastern Bluebird fledgling total up to nine for 2015.

Ursuline College recognizes individuals for years of service

retirees

From left to right: Sr. Ann Kelly, Ginny Folisi, Marty Kane and Mary Alice Saunders 

The College community thanks Sr. Ann Kelly, Ginny Folisi, Marty Kane and Mary Alice Saunders for their dedication and congratulates them on their retirement in 2014.

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Letter from the Editor

editing photoAs this time of year is often associated with making personal and professional renovations, I am excited to announce that Ursuline’s blog platform has developed into an online edition of the College’s magazine, VOICES. Having been published since 2008, VOICES is the main news source for everything Ursuline. The online edition will feature all the great things that Ursuline fans have grown accustomed to reading about in the printed version plus online stories added weekly, providing an interactive and relevant experience for our readers.

Below is my editor’s letter from the printed edition of VOICES (out February 1). The theme of this issue is community, how strong Ursuline values have carried the institution even through difficult times. We also showcase the great things that individuals in the Ursuline Community are doing and the lives they continue to touch. I hope you feel a sense of hope in how a small, Catholic, women-focused College in Ohio can work together to make a positive difference in the world.

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Professor Acknowledged for Exceptional Mentorship

The key to a successful career is having a great mentor or mentors along the way, Sheryl Sandberg argues in her most recent book Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead. Associate Professor and Public Relations and Marketing Program Director Laura Hammel, APR, Ph.D., defines the word mentor, as she is a trusted counselor and guide on campus.

Hammel was recognized for her mentorship work this past spring. She received the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) Greater Cleveland Chapter’s Davis Young Award for Exceptional Mentors 2013 at The Hill Lighthouse Young Awards in Cleveland. The award is given to a professional who exceptionally mentors students and young professionals. Since receiving the award, Hammel was approached for additional mentoring opportunities – on campus and off. “As a faculty member I mentor students in every step of their university career,” Hammel said. “I never saw myself as a mentor in a official capacity before winning the award, though.”

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Photo Credit: Google Images

Nelson Mandela’s Historic Contribution

Nelson Mandela, former South African President, passed away at age 95. Part of his legacy includes the unwavering promotion, and often achievement, of free and democratic societies around the globe. These “radical” societies served to widen the circle of participation in governance. The many, not just the few, developed a voice. Just as significant, Mandela was able to act without hatred and with a spirit of forgiveness—after spending twenty seven years in prison for his anti-apartheid struggles.

Mandela helped unite an often strife-ridden South Africa as it dealt with apartheid, a system of white minority rule that prohibited the South African majority right to vote, in the early 1990s. He helped to prepare for democratic elections in 1994 and became South Africa’s first black president. Mandela continued his crusade for democracy and against oppressive rule.

Photo Credit: Google Images

Photo Credit: Google Images

Mandela came out of prison not with anger but with a sense of forgiveness toward his captors. He promoted a message of peace. His efforts at building democratic and free societies through peaceful means led to the Nobel Prize.

Mandela showed that an individual mattered. The individual could shape history. The individual could unite opposing factions. I would enjoy listening to a conversation involving Mandela, Martin Luther King, Stokely Carmichael and Malcom X. President Obama, Colin Powell and Condoleezza Rice could join in as well.

Timothy K. Kinsella, Ph.D. is head of the History Department and Director of the Master of Liberal Arts Program at Ursuline College. 

2013 AOCC group pix

Art Therapy and Counseling (ATC) Faculty and Students Co-present at the All Ohio Counselors Conference

It was a histo2013 AOCC blog pptrical day for the art therapy and counseling faculty and students! It was the first time for us to present together at the All Ohio Counselors Conference in Columbus, Ohio. This took place on November 7, 2013. Presenters included two current ATC graduate students, Claire Whiteman, Mary Cassidy, and ATC alumni Steve Macek, M.A., an art therapist and professional counselor at University Hospital of Cleveland. Also presenting were ATC faculty Katherine Jackson, Ph.D. and myself (DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D)–along with Jonathan Appel, Ph.D., Associate Professor in the Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences at Tiffin University (TU) and TU student Erin Snapp.

Our joint research team presented empirical results of a year-long research project that 2013 AOCC group pixhas been investigating links between creativity and mental health. The title of the presentation was “The Relationship Between Measures of Creativity and Mental Health Measures.”

The aim of the study presented was to determine the extent to which multidimensional mental health measures predict measures of creativity as assessed by a measure of creative personality and an inventory of creative behaviors. The study also examined the interrelationships between mental health, personality measures, demographic variables, and measures of creativity. The research found that overall better mental health (emotional stability and low psychoticism, low autistic tendencies) appears associated with creative personality, but increased levels of anxiety, obsessive compulsive and somatization were associated with actual creative activity. Another major finding of the study was that there was a strong association between the mental health symptom measure of somatization and creativity across measures of creativity. Implications of this research for counseling and psychotherapy were also discussed at the presentation. The research strongly suggested that expressive therapies can and should be integrated within a clinical counseling practice. The research team is currently preparing the research for publication.

I appreciated Gail Rule-Hoffman’s (ATC program director) supportive attendance and her leadership throughout the conference.

DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D.is Associate Professor for Art Therapy and Counseling at Ursuline College.

Nicole, Emma, Ashely at the airport

Art Therapy and Counseling faculty and students attend and present at National Conference

Faculty and Students from the Department of Art Therapy and Counseling attended The Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES) conference, entitled “Promoting Unity While Affirming ACES signDiversity” held October 16 – 20 in Denver, Colorado.

Early in the morning on October 16th at the Cleveland airport, my husband Jonathan Appel and I saw many familiar faces including counseling program faculty and students from other Ohio universities and colleges. The plane appeared full of Ohio counselor educators and counseling students, also on their way to the ACES conference in Denver (including one of our own PhD professors!)

Upon arrival, after three hours of headache, we were able to adjust to the Denver altitude. We reunited with the ATC program director, Gail Rule-Hoffman, completed registration, and reconnected with Korean doctoral students and faculty, whom we knew from prior counseling conferences. Opening reception was filled with familiar faces from all over the US and we could not wait to attend countless presentations including education sessions, roundtables discussions, and poster sessions.

On October 17th, Jonathan Appel, Ph.D. from Tiffin University, myself, and Gail Rule-Hoffman, Teaching Diversity presentation - DoHee Kim-Appel, Gail Rule-Hoffman, Jonathan AppelATC presented an education session, entitled “Teaching Diversity: Utilization of Experiential Learning Approaches.” The session was very successful, and we exchanged effective teaching tools with participants and received positive feedback. Dr. Appel and I presented a roundtable in the late afternoon entitled, “Walls and Bridges: Barriers and Opportunities for Effective Learning in Between Non-native Speaking and Native Speaking Educators and Students.” The session attracted many international doctoral students and faculty members and we were able to exchange research ideas and perspectives on being educated in United States.

On October 18th, we woke up with snow on the ground in Denver! The snow did melt quickly under the bright sun and blue skies– which lasted for the rest of the day. After completing the third presentation entitled “Similarities and Differences Between the United States and the South Korean GeriatricSimilarities and Differences - DoHee Kim-Appel Healthcare Systems: Implications for Counseling,” we decided to spend the evening with our friend and his family who live in Denver. Before the dinner, we toured the famous Red Rock Amphitheater which was built in 1910. Since then various famous musicians have performed there. It was overwhelming with such a rich musical history and wish we were able to hear some of them in live concert (The Beatles play there in 1965). Later that evening we were reunited with the ATC faculty Katherine Jackson, Ph.D. and three ATC graduate students; Emma Pitchford, Nicole Topp, and Ashley Tilberg— as they all were also presenting at the conference.

Dr. Jackson and her students also had the honor of an accepted presentation. Dr. Jackson wrote “on October 19th, we spoke on the benefits of having student service learning in graduate school curriculums, Dr. Jackson, Emma, Nicole, Ashleyusing our El Salvador trip as a template. We also gave a brief overview of “lessons learned” in El Salvador, and the students were able to illuminate the audience with their in-depth learning and growth as a counselor/art therapist in training. Not only did we present our experience in El Salvador, but we heard amazing lectures and met some famous people in the field of counseling, we also had a lot of fun walking around Denver exploring interesting boutiques and sampling some Denver cuisine.”

According to Ashley Tilberg, “I feel like I got a sense for the diversity within counseling fields. Emma Pitchford added, “I also learned what the trends are in the counseling field.” Nicole Topp stated “attending the conference helped with my professional development.” All of them mutually stated “it was a great way to spend our fall break and it motivated us to attend additional conferences. “We do love learning!!! Poster presentation was also the way to go for us because we were able to have meaningful conversations with participants.”

By the Sunday morning– we were all tired and ready to return home. Dr. Jackson and Gail Rule-Hoffman left in the morning and the rest of us headed to the airport after the morning sessions. After deplaning twice with four hour delay due to the mechanical problems, we arrived in Cleveland well after midnight. We all managed our frustration very well, “mindfulness exercise work!!!” I am glad we all returned safely.

DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D.is  Associate Professor for Art Therapy and Counseling at Ursuline College.

Walls and Bridges presentationEmily Dennis, Gail Rule-Hoffman, Emma Pitchford, Ashley Tilberg, Nicole Topp at the presidential openingDoHee Kim-Appel, Gail Rule-Hoffman, Katherine JacksonThe Red Rock Amphitheater

Nema Saleem & Ashley Tilberg

Art Therapy and Counseling faculty and students attend 2013 BATA Symposium

It was a beautiful Friday morning, feeling tired from the trip to England and on the road again to Columbus, Ohio to attend 32nd Annual Buckeye Art Therapy Association (BATA)                        (http://www.buckeyearttherapy.org/) symposium, titled “Art Therapy: Self-Expression and Healing”  held September 26, 27 and 28 in Columbus, Ohio. Sister Kathleen Burke, Gail Rule-Hoffman and Diane Meros attended entire symposium.

I was greeted by my classmates, Barbra Greenwood and Laura Malbasa, dkimappel 1from early 1990s when I was an art therapy student at Ursuline College. Reminiscing our time at Ursuline, all of sudden I forgot how tired I was. It was such a pleasant surprise to reunite with them and it was one of the meaningful highlights of the day. Proud to see our recent graduates presenting at the symposium with their colleagues and seeing our motivated current students participating in the symposium overwhelmed me with excitement. Most of the current BATA board members are Ursuline College ATC alumnie.

Sister Kathleen’s presentation “Grace, Creativity and Breakthrough: Saint Hildergard of Bingen” taught  me how her journey to establish art therapy department at Ursuline College was deeply inspired by Saint Hildergard (http://hildegard.org/).  Listening to “A feather on the Breath of God” (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jdVcKfAZJMU) during her presentation, I could not help feeling empowered and it was such an educational presentation.

The Art Therapy profession has many pioneers, and meeting Dr. Wadeson was such a joy. Harriet Wadeson Ph.D., ACSW, LCSW, ATR-BC, HLM who was a keynote speaker for the symposium and she has been called “a mother of the art therapy profession.” She has ways to use words to tell incredible stories with art and it is a gift. One of our ATC current students, Heidi Semijalac, was the winner of the BATA 2013 student scholarship award to attend the symposium. Seeing her smile and excitement to meet Dr. Wadeson was another highlight of the day.

dkimappel 5dkimappel 6Ashley Rogolsdkimappel 4Sr. Kathleen, Gail with Dr. WadesonHeidi Semijalac & Jody Pittner

dkimappel 3Nema Saleem & Ashley TilbergLisa Wood

The BATA conference contained my past and present path at the same place. I am glad I made it for the day!

DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D. is  Associate Professor for Art Therapy and Counseling at Ursuline College.

Volunteer Day 2013