Tag Archives: Research

This Place Matters: Preservation Research in Cleveland

 

CPLHiP1
by Tara Smith, M.A. candidate, Historic Preservation

I have lived in the Northeast Ohio area almost my entire life. Trips to Cleveland were kind of a special event but I was stunned when we visited the Cleveland Public Library for a Historic Preservation field trip and realized that I had been missing out on a beautiful piece of the city. For those of you who have never seen the CPL from the outside or inside, I highly recommend it for either your future scholarly needs or just to experience a gem of Cleveland history and architecture.

The CPL now consists of two buildings, the first of which was built in 1925 as part of the Group Plan to develop the area of downtown Cleveland. The Beaux Arts architectural style has many beautiful details and shows how influential and thriving the city of Cleveland used to be. I, as well as other historic preservationists, believe that these buildings must be protected and their legacies maintained.

Read More

Biology major Sharita Hill awarded ‘Woodrow Wilson Ohio Teaching Fellowship’

131010111617-2

Biology major Sharita Hill has been awarded the 2014 Woodrow Wilson Ohio Teaching Fellowship. This is a national competition which requires several levels of evaluation. Hill is expected to graduate this May and will pursue her Master’s in Education at John Carroll University in the fall of 2014.

Hill has been working on her senior thesis project while interning at Case Western Reserve University, serving as a research assistant and program facilitator for the Infectious Diseases Alliance. She is also the current president of Students of Science at Ursuline. Hill is a mother of two and a Cleveland native.

Read More

2013 AOCC group pix

Art Therapy and Counseling (ATC) Faculty and Students Co-present at the All Ohio Counselors Conference

It was a histo2013 AOCC blog pptrical day for the art therapy and counseling faculty and students! It was the first time for us to present together at the All Ohio Counselors Conference in Columbus, Ohio. This took place on November 7, 2013. Presenters included two current ATC graduate students, Claire Whiteman, Mary Cassidy, and ATC alumni Steve Macek, M.A., an art therapist and professional counselor at University Hospital of Cleveland. Also presenting were ATC faculty Katherine Jackson, Ph.D. and myself (DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D)–along with Jonathan Appel, Ph.D., Associate Professor in the Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences at Tiffin University (TU) and TU student Erin Snapp.

Our joint research team presented empirical results of a year-long research project that 2013 AOCC group pixhas been investigating links between creativity and mental health. The title of the presentation was “The Relationship Between Measures of Creativity and Mental Health Measures.”

The aim of the study presented was to determine the extent to which multidimensional mental health measures predict measures of creativity as assessed by a measure of creative personality and an inventory of creative behaviors. The study also examined the interrelationships between mental health, personality measures, demographic variables, and measures of creativity. The research found that overall better mental health (emotional stability and low psychoticism, low autistic tendencies) appears associated with creative personality, but increased levels of anxiety, obsessive compulsive and somatization were associated with actual creative activity. Another major finding of the study was that there was a strong association between the mental health symptom measure of somatization and creativity across measures of creativity. Implications of this research for counseling and psychotherapy were also discussed at the presentation. The research strongly suggested that expressive therapies can and should be integrated within a clinical counseling practice. The research team is currently preparing the research for publication.

I appreciated Gail Rule-Hoffman’s (ATC program director) supportive attendance and her leadership throughout the conference.

DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D.is Associate Professor for Art Therapy and Counseling at Ursuline College.

Nicole, Emma, Ashely at the airport

Art Therapy and Counseling faculty and students attend and present at National Conference

Faculty and Students from the Department of Art Therapy and Counseling attended The Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES) conference, entitled “Promoting Unity While Affirming ACES signDiversity” held October 16 – 20 in Denver, Colorado.

Early in the morning on October 16th at the Cleveland airport, my husband Jonathan Appel and I saw many familiar faces including counseling program faculty and students from other Ohio universities and colleges. The plane appeared full of Ohio counselor educators and counseling students, also on their way to the ACES conference in Denver (including one of our own PhD professors!)

Upon arrival, after three hours of headache, we were able to adjust to the Denver altitude. We reunited with the ATC program director, Gail Rule-Hoffman, completed registration, and reconnected with Korean doctoral students and faculty, whom we knew from prior counseling conferences. Opening reception was filled with familiar faces from all over the US and we could not wait to attend countless presentations including education sessions, roundtables discussions, and poster sessions.

On October 17th, Jonathan Appel, Ph.D. from Tiffin University, myself, and Gail Rule-Hoffman, Teaching Diversity presentation - DoHee Kim-Appel, Gail Rule-Hoffman, Jonathan AppelATC presented an education session, entitled “Teaching Diversity: Utilization of Experiential Learning Approaches.” The session was very successful, and we exchanged effective teaching tools with participants and received positive feedback. Dr. Appel and I presented a roundtable in the late afternoon entitled, “Walls and Bridges: Barriers and Opportunities for Effective Learning in Between Non-native Speaking and Native Speaking Educators and Students.” The session attracted many international doctoral students and faculty members and we were able to exchange research ideas and perspectives on being educated in United States.

On October 18th, we woke up with snow on the ground in Denver! The snow did melt quickly under the bright sun and blue skies– which lasted for the rest of the day. After completing the third presentation entitled “Similarities and Differences Between the United States and the South Korean GeriatricSimilarities and Differences - DoHee Kim-Appel Healthcare Systems: Implications for Counseling,” we decided to spend the evening with our friend and his family who live in Denver. Before the dinner, we toured the famous Red Rock Amphitheater which was built in 1910. Since then various famous musicians have performed there. It was overwhelming with such a rich musical history and wish we were able to hear some of them in live concert (The Beatles play there in 1965). Later that evening we were reunited with the ATC faculty Katherine Jackson, Ph.D. and three ATC graduate students; Emma Pitchford, Nicole Topp, and Ashley Tilberg— as they all were also presenting at the conference.

Dr. Jackson and her students also had the honor of an accepted presentation. Dr. Jackson wrote “on October 19th, we spoke on the benefits of having student service learning in graduate school curriculums, Dr. Jackson, Emma, Nicole, Ashleyusing our El Salvador trip as a template. We also gave a brief overview of “lessons learned” in El Salvador, and the students were able to illuminate the audience with their in-depth learning and growth as a counselor/art therapist in training. Not only did we present our experience in El Salvador, but we heard amazing lectures and met some famous people in the field of counseling, we also had a lot of fun walking around Denver exploring interesting boutiques and sampling some Denver cuisine.”

According to Ashley Tilberg, “I feel like I got a sense for the diversity within counseling fields. Emma Pitchford added, “I also learned what the trends are in the counseling field.” Nicole Topp stated “attending the conference helped with my professional development.” All of them mutually stated “it was a great way to spend our fall break and it motivated us to attend additional conferences. “We do love learning!!! Poster presentation was also the way to go for us because we were able to have meaningful conversations with participants.”

By the Sunday morning– we were all tired and ready to return home. Dr. Jackson and Gail Rule-Hoffman left in the morning and the rest of us headed to the airport after the morning sessions. After deplaning twice with four hour delay due to the mechanical problems, we arrived in Cleveland well after midnight. We all managed our frustration very well, “mindfulness exercise work!!!” I am glad we all returned safely.

DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D.is  Associate Professor for Art Therapy and Counseling at Ursuline College.

Walls and Bridges presentationEmily Dennis, Gail Rule-Hoffman, Emma Pitchford, Ashley Tilberg, Nicole Topp at the presidential openingDoHee Kim-Appel, Gail Rule-Hoffman, Katherine JacksonThe Red Rock Amphitheater

Oxford group

The “Ohio Collective” Presents in Oxford, England!

After London, the time for the conference and presentation at Mansfield College (University of Oxford, Oxford, U.K.) finally arrived. The paper presentations would be based off joint research project which was developed between Ursuline College and Tiffin University. The research examined the relationships between creativity and mental health/mental illness. Members of the project team who presented in Oxford included UC professor, DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D., UC Art Therapy and Counseling graduate students, Claire Whiteman, Mary Cassidy, & Rebecca Stanic, Tiffin University professor Jonathan Appel, Ph.D., and undergraduate behavioral sciences student Erin Snapp.

Oxford proved to be a relaxed and calm setting in contrast to the helter skelter (Beatles pun intended!) of London.

Both my husband and I agreed that there can be no place more inspiring to an academic than Oxford. The pastoral settings among the ancient gothic architecture –left us truly breathless. Just strolling in the surroundings that once held Lewis Carroll, Aldous Huxley, Oscar Wilde, Percy Bysshe Shelley, J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, T. S. Eliot, John Wycliffe, John Wesley, Stephen Hawking, Edwin Hubble, as well as heads of state (26 British prime ministers have attended Oxford) gave us the momentary illusion of being more enlightened!

We even made sure we even visited the famous “Eagle and the Child” public house—which was a gathering place for “The Inklings,” which was an Oxford writers’ group that included C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, Charles Williams and Hugo Dyson. It is from here that the writers read and discussed various works, including their manuscripts.

University of Oxford!

Although its exact date of origin is not completely know, there is evidence of teaching as far back as 1096 making it the oldest university in the English-speaking world! The University of Oxford is actually over 30 or so semi-autonomous colleges, which made for quite a diversity of place. (http://www.ox.ac.uk/visitors_friends/visiting_the_university/index.html)

The conference itself was held on the beautiful campus of Mansfield College (The main building was designed by architect Basil Champneys, and built between 1887-1890. It houses the main college library, the law library and the theology library). One could not think a more perfect setting for an intentionally intimate conference (just 25 or so papers out of 100 submitted were accepted).

International and Inter-Disciplinary

The conference was sponsored by Inter-Disciplinary.Net, which is “a forum for the exchange and interaction of ideas, research and points of view that bear on a wide range of issues of concern and interest in the contemporary world”. The organization goals are to” promote and sponsor inter- and multi-disciplinary encounters by bringing people together from differing contexts, disciplines, professions, and vocations, with the aim to engender and nurture engagements that cross the boundaries of intellectual work.”  This group also hopes that its “projects, conferences and publishing activities are creative and novel, and they evolve constantly as we seek out and foster emergentdevelopments.” http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/  Dr. Rob Fisher is the Network Founder and Network Leader. His great vision is apparent through the well run experience.

Conference participants were educators and scholars from various countries including, Scotland, UK, Poland, Germany, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, New Zealand, South Africa, Montreal, Italy, and the United States. There were psychiatrists, clinical psychologists, a feminist art historian, a medicalanthropologist, a philosopher, an attorney, several literature professors, and several additional professionals.

There was a collective feeling among us that the conference organizers were achieving their goals, and we were very impressed with the design and intent of the conference. It was truly fantastic to have cross national and cross-disciplinary discussions. It was very gratifying to see all the students treated as peers by both the organizers and attendees. The ideas and discussion (both formal and informal) were some of the best professional experiences we ever had. Special appreciate goes to conference facilitator Gonzalo Araoz—for his wit and support. He stood as a shining role model for us and our students.

We (Dr. Dohee Kim-Appel and husband Dr. Jonathan Appel) on the first day presented a paper entitled: “Non-Rational States of Consciousness: Understanding and Counseling ‘Madness’.”

The research team (which came to be dubbed “The Ohio Collective” at the conference) jointly presented the paper, “Creativity, Critique, and Cutting Edge: Creativity and Madness.” Each member of the team took a research area of the topic and presented on it– and opened the topic for further discussion. All the students presented with skill and grace. As our students presented extremely well — Jonathan and I were elated. The experience confirmed the reason why we wanted to be educators. Feedback from the participants regarding our students was overwhelming. We all seem to recognize that learning comes in many forms. I was proud to be part of the “Ohio Collective” in Oxford!

The blog post was written by DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D. Associate Professor for Art Therapy and Counseling at Ursuline College. 

London Mary and Chris

On Our Way to Oxford, England!

A joint research project was developed between Ursuline College and Tiffin University. This project started in the spring and was designed to examine the relationships between creativity and mental health/mental illness. Members of the project team who attended the Oxford Conference included UC professor, DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D., UC Art Therapy and Counseling graduate students, Claire Whiteman, Mary Cassidy, & Rebecca Stanic, Tiffin University professor Jonathan Appel, Ph.D., and undergraduate behavioral sciences student Erin Snapp. The goals for the project were to expose students to the research experience, and present the research project(s) at national and international conference(s) and ultimately produce a publication.

When our paper proposals were accepted by the inter-disciplinary and international 6th Global Conference: Making Sense of Madness, we decided to invite students from both institutions. It was exhilarating to see the students’ motivation and excitement.  The Conference was scheduled from September 17th-19th at the Mansfield College (University of Oxford) in Oxford, England (http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/making-sense-of/madness/conference-programme-abstracts-and-papers/)

London!

On our way to participate and present at the 6th Global Conference – Making Sense of Madness in Oxford, most of us decided to independently visit London for the weekend. Students left the day before Jonathan and I left for the England. Arriving in London on a rainy Friday late evening, contributed some anxiety in a strange city – with fast driving cars, crowds, and narrowed streets. Crossing the street could be a challenge due to the opposite road direction!  Mornings in England appeared to start off sunny and beautiful with blue sky– but by afternoons it became unpredictable with gray, rainy weather being the norm.

We left our hotel when the weather was bright and decided to walk without a specific plan. We were misinformed on directions and ended up at the British museum! (http://www.britishmuseum.org/). The central gathering area in the British museum was similar to the Cleveland Museum of Art atrium. There were numerous exhibitions and the one about “living and dying” was an interesting one. The goal for the exhibition was to “explores how people everywhere deal with the tough realities of life and death. “These challenges are shared by all, but strategies to deal with them very from place to place, people to people” (Trust Gallery).

It was also natural for us to visit the national gallery (http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/) and experience sitting in front of the “Sunflowers” painting by the Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh. We then continued to explore London and decided to take Thames River cruise (http://www.riverthames.co.uk/history.htm). We were expecting to see only old wall of castles and historical buildings along the riverside. However, the river was also decorated with modern various shapes of glassed buildings. After the cruise, we walked through the St. James Park (http://www.royalparks.org.uk/parks/hyde_park/history.cfm) to Buckingham palace and eventually to Piccadilly Circus, and on to Chinatown and Soho neighborhoods. One of the highlight of the day was to run into one of the UC students (a member of our visiting research team), Mary Cassidy, in the middle of a busy London Street.

Sunday, early in the morning, we decided re-enact the Beatles Abbey Road Album cover crossing near Abbey Road studios in St. John’s Wood. Jonathan stated, “It took me 50 years to be here, but I now can scratch that off my ‘bucket list!’.” The weather was beautiful for our Beatles pilgrimage. Another highlight of the day was listening to the classical group, Brodsky Quartet, (http://www.brodskyquartet.co.uk/) at the King’s Place in London, while the rain picked up outside (now Ohio weather seems not so bad). Monday we left London for Oxford and ran into two other research team students (Rebecca Stanic and Erin Snapp) at the Victoria coach station. This reunited group then travelled together across into English countryside to historic Oxford.

More to Come!

The blog post was written by DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D. Associate Professor for Art Therapy and Counseling at Ursuline College.

#AftertheLecture Creating Meaning from Personal Archival Stories

image001American Mental Health Counseling Association Conference, Washington D.C. July 2013: Ursuline Graduate students in Art Therapy & Counseling along with Professor Katherine Jackson, Ph.D. presented gathered research entitled…..

Narrative Reflections: Creating Meaning from Personal Archival Stories

Nema, Emma and I (Katherine) excitedly drove to Washington D.C. full of anticipation and nerves! We kept pinching ourselves at having been accepted into this prestigious national symposium.

On Saturday July 20th, we presented our research on women’s stories and narratives to a warm audience of mental health professionals. We were thrilled by the energy and enthusiasm in which we were embraced, and learned a lot about ourselves and others in this endeavor. The greatest lesson learned in presenting our data, was to always remember to take risks, and dare to dream big in professional endeavors like this one!

Our research studied twenty-five women of many ethnicities and geographical locations who were interviewed about remembered female

photo

lineage stories from their childhood or lives in general. These stories were carefully gathered and later transcribed. The transcriptions yielded a collection of interesting themes, such as empowerment, victimization, having a voice/ speaking up and the ability to persevere through a myriad of obstacles. These themes were persistent and appeared to give meaning and richness to the women’s lives as a whole. In some ways, themes or teachings gleaned from remembered stories were used as mantras or archetypal images that could be mentally and emotionally referenced during times of challenge and transition.

This narrative study with adult women sought to understand the connection of remembered and treasured stories in relationship to purpose and self-meaning in participants lives. What began as an experiment in creating Judy Chicago style historical dinner plate art work with a group of graduate counseling and art therapy students, turned into a quest for learning and understanding of the relationship between remembered story and its effects on life purpose and meaning (Chicago, 2007).

After the Lecture: In the View of the Korean Mountains

After experiencing the hustle and bustle of Korean cities—it was now time for country-side travels. My husband and I first decided to venture to the Southwest part of South Korea. We took a surprisingly comfortable five-hour bus ride through the mountain-cradled picturesque country-side towards Haenam County, Jeonnam Province. Beside the natural beauty of the destination—we had made arrangements for a week-end “temple stay” at Daeheungsa Temple – a Buddhist Temple nestled within a remote national park. Daeheungsa is located on Duryun Mountain, in the southernmost area of Korea, and is the head temple for the 22nd District of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism. The exact date that the temple was founded is unknown, but historians are certain that the temple has stood since the Three-Kingdom period of ancient Korea (4th-9th centuries CE). The Temple Stay program is an educational and a cultural experience program designed to enhance the understanding of Korean spirituality and Korean culture. A typical temple stay program entails overnight stays at a Buddhist temple, and experiential participation in such Buddhist rituals as yebul (ceremonial service), chamseon (meditation), and barugongyang (monastic meal). We were given very comfortable living quarters (with traditional floor beddings) as well as traditional clothing. We had very welcoming and helpful guides, including much individual attention from the Head Education Monk. He provided many formal and informal discussions of Korean Buddhists’ life, culture, and spirituality. Possible future collaboration of Korean to English text translations even discussed.

After the temple stay, we also made arrangements to stay nearby at what has been described as one of the “first” Korean “Inns”. This “Inn” was nothing like what we think of in America as an Inn. In Korea, these overnight places are called a “Yeogwan”.  Yeogwans are a traditional Korean housing structure, with heated floors and in this case a stunning natural view. Traditional Korean meals are also served for a low fee. We enjoyed a delicious dinner of fresh fish and vegetables with a scenic view of the mountains. Nothing could have been a more perfect way to end this country side-trip.

Later, after returning to Seoul, we also did a day tour to the DMZ in the Northern-most part of South Korea.  The DMZ area is near the border of North Korea and is a place of great contradictions. It is a very peaceful and an exquisite natural area of a renewed nature preserve. Since no large structures–urban or military are allowed there—it has abundant natural and wild life. Many animal and plant species– once nearly extinct —have returned in this quiet undisturbed setting. But in this beautiful stillness there are also signs of great tensions. There are many Army checkpoints, restrictions, and watchful armed observations by military soldiers. As we ventured our glances into the vast distance mountains of North Korea—one can’t help but feel the pain of past losses and pray for a future peace.

The blog post was written by DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D. Associate Professor for Art Therapy and Counseling at Ursuline College.

Art Therapy & Counseling Faculty travels to South Korea

dohee_1 dohee_2My heart was pounding as soon as we landed in Korea. I knew we were in Korea because of the familiar smells of spices, sounds, as well as the kindness of people at the airport. We were greeted by my family and exchanged lots of hugs. My favorite black noodle dish was my first choice of meal and it was delicious.

The next day was my husband’s 50th birthday, so my family took us to a restaurant in the Korean countryside via a fun fast train ride. The next day attended the grand opening of the 20th IAGG World Congress of Gerontology and Geriatrics in Downtown Seoul. The conference has over 5,000 attendees from countries all over the world, including the prime minister of Korea, Jung Hong-won, who gave the opening speech.Airport in South Korea

The conference thus far has been an all-sense stimulating event. From the sights, sounds, and tastes of Korea culture to the stimulating presentations and discussions—it has been a deeply enriching experience—one that has made me very proud to be of Korean Heritage!

The blog post was written by DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D. Associate Professor for Art Therapy and Counseling at Ursuline College.

St. Martin de Porres

We did it!

Our first meeting at St. Martin’s is done, and I think it went well. We had a class of of 11 boys and girls who live in the Glenville area and we taught them about spreading germs. Of course we had the occasional hiccup because no kid wants to feel like the are in school, over the summer, but we kept them engaged and we all had fun. I wasn’t even nervous about doing my hand washing presentation. We will be going to St. Martin’s every other Thursday throughout the summer.  Our next topic will be vaccinations and communication. These kids are so amazing and open to learn, that just being in the room is a pleasure.  I can’t wait until our next session.

-Sharita Hill