Tag Archives: Students

Sewing Her Way to the Top

Written by Hannah Barucky, junior fashion major

School is a big coDSC_5269mmitment. Suddenly, you’ve given up free time, brain space, and sleep to get assignments in on time. You’ve got to work harder, sacrifice money and energy, and be invested to do well. Is it worth it?

My decision to return to school after a two year hiatus was considered carefully and weighed against a lot of different factors. I had tested college for almost two years after high school and come out the other end with the only real difference showing in my bank account. When I discovered Ursuline and began to consider diving back into the undergraduate process, it was with a clear focus and shining goal at the other end.

As a fashion design major, I’m gaining completely invaluable knowledge that will carry me further into the world of entertainment: whether that means film, TV, or theater.

I plan to continue my work in an industry I’ve fallen in love with, but I can only do that through my training I gain every time I step on campus. I inadvertently fell for a future that is laden with uncertainties, each gig its own challenge, and every day choosing to jump off the next cliff. School is extremely important to prepare me to be ready to take those leaps.


Being prepared for a competitive field gives me drive, and inspires me in every project I tackle in school. I attempt to see every little seam as a test of how I work under pressure, and each project as valuable pieces for my portfolio that can—and will—get me a foot in the right doors down the road, or whenever those opportunities come.

Education Classes at Ursuline – Teaching Life Skills and Leadership

Our major of the month for August is Education. To learn more about the Education Unit at Ursuline College, we interviewed the co-directors of the Education Unit, Dr. Mary Jo Cherry and Dr. Jim Connell. Cherry and Connell both shared valuable information about why being an education major at Ursuline is so special.

What are some things that you learn in an education class that help you for the rest of your life?

Jim Connell: I guess I would start by saying that you really do get in touch with who you are and who you are going to be. We emphasize that quite a bit – it is important, if you’re going to be an effective leader, to really know yourself. That’s just essential. You deepen the understanding of yourself so that you can be an effective leader.

Mary Jo Cherry: And I would say that’s probably similar in teacher education.

If you were talking to people that had a negative image of people in education or education majors in general, what would you want those people to know about education majors?

Mary Jo Cherry: I would say, speaking for undergrad, they are very dedicated and they want to work with kids. They are very hard working. A lot of our undergrad education majors are athletes, and a lot of them work full-time or part-time. You can’t be in this major and not be dedicated. They don’t get many electives, if any at all. It’s not for the faint of heart. These students, in addition to their coursework on campus, they’re out in the schools from their very first semester. As an example, the special education majors, before they even get to student teaching, have clocked a minimum of 365 additional hours. They’re really dedicated and they’re committed to doing what’s best for kids.

Jim Connell: I would go in a couple directions there also. Mary Jo ended with discussing hours. In both of our field courses, we exceed the minimum you see at some other institutions. If someone has a negative image, I’m not so sure that I can change that. But, what I can tell them is that the people who are in education operate out of a high sense of commitment and a strong sense of personal satisfaction from what they do. They really do enjoy it.

Mary Jo Cherry: The other thing I can mention is that our graduates see themselves in a profession, and they see themselves giving back as part of their professional responsibility. Our undergraduate advisory board has some of our undergrad graduates, but we also have educational administration graduates, who just happen to end up on our board because someone nominated them. They are absolutely wonderful. Educators are by and large a very committed group. They see themselves not only as working in the profession but also giving back. There’s a wonderful sense of community.

Any tips for current education students, future education majors, or recent graduates of Ursuline’s programs?

Mary Jo Cherry: I always say get as much experience around the children you want to teach as you can, so age level, developmental level. So for my students, I usually say it doesn’t matter what you do with them, just be sure you want to do this. Get as much experience as you can. The other thing I say is be willing to move where the jobs are. If you’re in a position to move, there are teaching jobs all over the country. I suggest that they be open to charter schools, private schools, parochial schools, and public schools, because you need to get your foot in the door and you need experience. If you’re always doing what you truly believe is the best for children, you won’t be hurting anybody.

Jim Connell: I think I would go a different way. I simply say to people that you want to look around and pick a program that has success and a network. We work to make sure people are in a place that they can get jobs, and we help them network at all times. Look for not just the beginning of the program, but the end.

Mary Jo Cherry: We really do work as much as possible with individuals, as opposed to a group of people in a class. The whole institution, not just our unit, not just our programs, walks the talk. We are really here for you, and you are not a number. There are at least three students who are currently in the educational administration graduate program that went through our teacher education undergraduate program.

I want the students to know a little bit more about you. What is your favorite part of teaching education classes?

Mary Jo Cherry: It’s the students I teach. That’s it. I love being with the students, and it’s energizing, it’s fun, and I just enjoy it.

Jim Connell: Mary Jo was talking about enthusiasm. I always present the Ralph Waldo Emerson quote “Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm.” I can be excited about teaching curriculum development, but it’s making the students enthusiastic about it that’s the key. It’s getting the students excited about what they’re learning.

Mary Jo Cherry: We do our administrative duties, but we only do it because we can still teach. I bring stickers, and pencils for every occasion. And I love sharing stories. I warn them that anything they say in class, I’ll have a story about it.


Counseling and Art Therapy students go to South Dakota on service learning trip

Written by Katherine Jackson, assistant professor, Counseling and Art Therapy department

photo 8From June 21 – 27, 2015, graduate students, alumnae, one undergraduate student, a few community members and three faculty members journeyed to Eagle Butte, South Dakota, to work with Lakota Sioux youth at the Cheyenne River Youth Project (CRYP) which is located on the Cheyenne River Native American Reservation.

Graduate students in the Counseling and Art Therapy program had suggested about a year ago that we do a service learning trip with impoverished and at risk populations in our own country, and we discovered a wonderful opportunity at Cheyenne River Youth Project. CRYP was founded in the 1980s to help give youth and teens a place to congregate where they could enjoy healthy snacks, activities and socialize. CRYP was a big success from the start, and soon after opening they were able to secure grants and funding to build a new center that could accommodate almost all of the youth in and around the Eagle Butte area. At present, CRYP serves hundreds of children, providing sports, art, tutoring, a youth run coffee shop, a sustainable organic garden, a graffiti art park and a healthy eating program which offers whole food meals every evening for any child in the community.

The Coordinator of Volunteer Service, Tammy Eagle Hunter, explained the philosophy at CRYP, which is “Don’t feel sorry for us and try to help, but rather join with us and together we will make things better.” This statement, although simple, sums up the attitude at CRYP. Everyone is encouraged to help side-by-side with the Lakota Sioux to maintain the community, work with the kids and pitch in wherever needed.

While we were there, we workphoto 4ed on cleaning, landscaping, gardening and organizing the center in the morning. In the afternoons, 30-40 youth arrived to participate in art therapy, nature activities, games, yoga and loving care from the Ursuline group. We provided support, care and lots of fun. Not only did the kids get to do art therapy and create many beautiful art creations, but they got their first taste of yoga. Yoga was a hit with many of the kids because it was so different than anything they had ever experienced.

While we were at the center, we learned first hand how alcoholism, drug abuse, child abuse, domestic violence, low socioeconomic status and poor dietary habits affect this vulnerable population. Many of the children got their only meal of the day at the CRYP center and endured parental neglect and abuse at home. Despite these hardships, the resiliency of these Lakota Sioux children is remarkable. The children embraced us with open arms and hearts, and we found a welcome home away from home at the center and in the reservation.

photo 13

We were fortunate enough to have a Lakota artisan, a bead worker, and a native storyteller and dancer work with us for an afternoon. We learned that the Lakota language is an oral language and thus is almost extinct. The Lakota people are attempting to put the language in written form to help preserve it and also to maintain important Lakota traditions. For example, in Lakota there is no word that means war, and this peaceful tradition is built right into rituals and community gatherings. Most quarrels are handled by compromise, with harmony being a prized value in the population.

One week did not seem like enough time to fully visit and get to know the people at the CRYP center and on the Cheyenne River Reservation. We are hopeful that we can return next year and make it an annual service learning trip to help the Lakota Sioux youth and continue to forge and build relationships with both the CRYP and the Cheyenne River Reservation.



Dancing Around College with an iPod – Christmas Edition from Maggie Stark on Vimeo.

The Admission Team would like to dedicate this song to all of our prospective students! Watching this video is sure to make you fall in love with UC students & bring some holiday cheer to your day!

#UC2018 Welcome class of 2018!

Fall Orientation, August 23 & 24, 2014, photos by alumna Maggie Stark ’14.


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Ursuline celebrates ‘Preservation Month’


Sarah and Hannah joined other HiPsters in presenting a booth at EarthFest 2014. Over 15,000 people attended Ohio’s premier environmental education event.

In Centennial, author James A. Michener asserts “During the few years allotted to each of us, we are the guardians of our earth, the custodians of our heritage, and the caretakers of our future.”

What an inspiring affirmation for preserving cultural memory and the intersections between Historic Preservation and environmental responsibility! The above statement encourages emphasis on the importance of the land and distinctive sense of place in our personal and national identity.

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Ursuline College hosts annual Innovations ‘14 student fashion show April 27


Ursuline College’s senior student fashion designers take their original creations to the runway at the annual Innovations ’14 fashion show Sunday, April 27, 11:30 AM – 2 PM at Executive Caterers Landerhaven.

“I don’t have to tell fashion students to love their work, they already do.That is the key to success, both financially and professionally. And that’s how I know our students will be successful,” said Connie Korosec Ph.D., Professor and Chair of the Fashion Department.

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Art Therapy and Counseling graduate student finalist for the EXPYS ‘Best Intern Award’

Elizabeth Bailey-Grincrus & Natalie Jernigan

Elizabeth Bailey-Grincrus & Natalie Jernigan

On March 27, 2014, the Northeast Ohio Council on Higher Education (NOCH) and Cleveland Business Connects (CBC) presented The Expys, honoring students, employers and internship programs in Northeast Ohio.

Elizabeth Bailey-Grincius, Ursuline Art Therapy and Counseling graduate student, was nominated as a finalist in the category of the 2014 EXPYS Best Intern award. Bailey-Grincius is currently completing her internship at the Centers for Families and Children in Cleveland, Ohio. She was nominated by her site supervisor, Natalie Jernigan. Bailey-Grincius has been an outstanding student and the ATC department is extremely proud of her achievement.

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Ursuline College’s 15th Annual Faculty Lecture Series to celebrate the “Best Closet in Cleveland”


With over 3,500 pieces of 20th Century American fashion donated by Greater Clevelanders, Ursuline College’s Historic Costume Study Collection has been dubbed the “Best Closet in Cleveland.” In honor of its upcoming 30th Anniversary, the College’s 15th Annual Faculty Lecture Series will focus on the collection. Constance Korosec, Ph.D., Chair and Professor of Fashion and Historic Costume Study Collection Curator will present the lecture Tuesday, April 8, 2014 at 7PM in the Mullen Little Theater at Ursuline College.

“Each year, all of us at Ursuline look forward to the Faculty Lecture Series, when we can share our fabulous faculty’s expertise with the greater Cleveland community. This spring we are especially excited to focus on our fashion program, which will be celebrating a hallmark anniversary this fall. Korosec is a well-known speaker and her lecture promises to be both educational and enjoyable,” said JoAnne Podis, Ph.D., Ursuline College’s Vice President of Academic Affairs.

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H.E.L.P Malawi Sewing journey: day one


by Molly Sabolsky, Nursing Student

I can’t even begin to explain how amazing this first day at the school was. We entered the yard of the school and we were greeted by so many beautiful, smiling faces. It was overwhelming – so many of the children wanted to touch our hands.

I think the theme of this trip is “go with the flow.” After setting up the sewing room, we were told that we would not have power until the next day, so our sewing machines were not going to work. We switched up our game plan and decided to teach our hand sewing lesson instead.

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