Tag Archives: Summer

#July4 Who else is hitting the beach? Or, wishes they were!

july4_euclidbeach

Sneak peek >> Summer 2014 Issue

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Sneak peek >> Summer 2014 Issue

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#TGIF Friday inspiration.

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After the Lecture: In the View of the Korean Mountains

After experiencing the hustle and bustle of Korean cities—it was now time for country-side travels. My husband and I first decided to venture to the Southwest part of South Korea. We took a surprisingly comfortable five-hour bus ride through the mountain-cradled picturesque country-side towards Haenam County, Jeonnam Province. Beside the natural beauty of the destination—we had made arrangements for a week-end “temple stay” at Daeheungsa Temple – a Buddhist Temple nestled within a remote national park. Daeheungsa is located on Duryun Mountain, in the southernmost area of Korea, and is the head temple for the 22nd District of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism. The exact date that the temple was founded is unknown, but historians are certain that the temple has stood since the Three-Kingdom period of ancient Korea (4th-9th centuries CE). The Temple Stay program is an educational and a cultural experience program designed to enhance the understanding of Korean spirituality and Korean culture. A typical temple stay program entails overnight stays at a Buddhist temple, and experiential participation in such Buddhist rituals as yebul (ceremonial service), chamseon (meditation), and barugongyang (monastic meal). We were given very comfortable living quarters (with traditional floor beddings) as well as traditional clothing. We had very welcoming and helpful guides, including much individual attention from the Head Education Monk. He provided many formal and informal discussions of Korean Buddhists’ life, culture, and spirituality. Possible future collaboration of Korean to English text translations even discussed.

After the temple stay, we also made arrangements to stay nearby at what has been described as one of the “first” Korean “Inns”. This “Inn” was nothing like what we think of in America as an Inn. In Korea, these overnight places are called a “Yeogwan”.  Yeogwans are a traditional Korean housing structure, with heated floors and in this case a stunning natural view. Traditional Korean meals are also served for a low fee. We enjoyed a delicious dinner of fresh fish and vegetables with a scenic view of the mountains. Nothing could have been a more perfect way to end this country side-trip.

Later, after returning to Seoul, we also did a day tour to the DMZ in the Northern-most part of South Korea.  The DMZ area is near the border of North Korea and is a place of great contradictions. It is a very peaceful and an exquisite natural area of a renewed nature preserve. Since no large structures–urban or military are allowed there—it has abundant natural and wild life. Many animal and plant species– once nearly extinct —have returned in this quiet undisturbed setting. But in this beautiful stillness there are also signs of great tensions. There are many Army checkpoints, restrictions, and watchful armed observations by military soldiers. As we ventured our glances into the vast distance mountains of North Korea—one can’t help but feel the pain of past losses and pray for a future peace.

The blog post was written by DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D. Associate Professor for Art Therapy and Counseling at Ursuline College.

Summer Reads

If you live in Northeast Ohio, this summer’s weather has been less than desirable to say the least. If you find yourself with free time, as many of us students do, fill your spare time with a great book. Reading during the summer keeps your mind sharp, especially if you are not enrolled in summer courses! Oprah’s reading list offers plenty of reads to keep you occupied this summer! The list contains books of all genres to be enjoyed by all!

http://www.oprah.com/book-list/Summer-Reading-Summer-Reading-Guide-2012_1

Samantha Humphrey, Junior Nursing Major at Ursuline College

Future Arrows Cookout!

Is there anything that screams more summer than a cookout? As the summer weather breaks, we are eager to indulge in the sun with the addition of BBQ!  While some cookouts can be high-maintenance, we are looking for an opportunity to hang out and learn about our students and students who want to learn more about Ursuline.  The Office of Undergraduate Admissions is beyond excited to host our first annual Future Arrows cookout! We hope you all will join us July 9!

To learn more about the Future Arrows Cookout or to register for the event, click here.

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As you try to contain your excitement, here is a fun summer cookout recipe for you to enjoy:

 

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Photo Cred: @Pinterest

Summer Sweet Tea Punch

Ingredients:

  • 3 family-size tea bags
  • 2 cups loosely packed fresh mint leaves
  • 1 (33.8-oz.) bottle peach nectar
  • 1/2 (12-oz.) can frozen lemonade concentrate, thawed
  • 1/2 cup Simple Sugar Syrup
  • 1 (1-liter) bottle ginger ale, chilled $
  • 1 (1-liter) bottle club soda, chilled
  • Garnish: fresh peach wedges

 

Research is my life.

Research is my life.  I’m the kind of person who is never content with knowing that things work or don’t work.  I need to know how and why they work or don’t work. Science research allows me the opportunity to answer these questions through experiments and data collection.  My name is Sharita Hill.   I am 27 years old and a mother of two wonderful children. I am also a Biology Pre-med major at Ursuline. I will be starting my senior year in the Fall of 2013, but this blog is to talk about the amazing research opportunity that I received this summer.Sharita Hill

It all started around February of this year. Professor Snyder, of Ursuline’s biology department sent out a mass email to all of her science students about summer internship opportunities at Case Western Reserve University. This immediately caught my attention because Case is a very well known research school, not to mention it is where I plan to earn my master’s degree.  From the list I found the Minority HIV Research Training Program (MHRTP) through the Center for AIDS Research (CFAR).  I would be spending the whole summer working with a team of doctors dedicated to introducing advancements, both medical and holistic, in the effort to fight HIV and AIDS.  It seemed like a dream come true.  The only problem was that the deadline for the application was one week away.

I scrambled to put together all of the things that the application required of me, and enlisted the help of chemistry professor Dr. Preston and  biology professor Snyder to write letters of recommendation for me.  They were both willing and able to produce letters within 24 hours. I’m not quite sure what they wrote, but two months later I received an email from the MHRTP, informing me that I was the only applicant who had been accepted into the program.

On May 24 I was able to have a face to face meeting with my program mentor, Dr. Robert Salata.  He is a Professor and Executive Vice-Chair of the Department of Medicine and the Chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases and HIV Medicine at CWRU.  He is a fantastic mentor match for me.  He is devoted to research and making a difference in the world.  His research involves education and prevention techniques in order to prevent the spread of HIV. Using the prior education and prevention work that he has done in Uganda, he was able to design a very similar outreach program for a high risk HIV/ STI area here in Cleveland. The program is designed to target adolescents and teens. I was informed that I will be in charge of collecting statistical data concerning how informed teens are about safe sex practices and how their level of education contributes to the number of sexually transmitted infections (STI) within the community. I will also be leading classes to help teens make better informed choices about safe sex practices.

My first official day of work will begin on Wednesday May 29. I’m very excited to see what impact I can have on furthering the goals of this program. The staff has been so welcoming to me; I only hope that I can add more greatness to this already fantastic team.

After the Lecture: What does an Ecologist do with their summer “break”?

That is a good question!  Hopefully this post will provide some insight.Jenise Snyder working with wetland plants in Belize

First though… who am I and what am I going to blog about this summer?  My name is Jenise Snyder and I am a full-time Biology Instructor at Ursuline College.  I have been teaching at Ursuline for 3 years.  I am an Ecologist, specifically a Wetland Ecologist and have been studying tropical and subtropical wetlands for the past 12 years.

As a Ph.D. student in Ecology at the University of California, Davis, I have been investigating how excess nutrients from fertilizers impact naturally low nutrient wetlands in Belize.  Part of my summer travel will actually be to work on writing the final chapters of my dissertation.

The rest of my summer travel is for vacation… well not really.  As an educator, you kind of never take that professor hat off.  So while I am going on vacation to Miami (Florida, not Ohio) and Belize, I know I will be collecting snippets of information, pictures, and  legally collected specimens, that will be used in my future classes.

So what am I planning to do on vacation?  Well first off, go to the beach!  My hometown of Miami has lovely beaches that I plan to visit and soak up the sun.  I will do some eating too.  I love Cuban food namely: café con leche, flan, and some pastelitos (little pastries).  Plus, I am going to visit my family.

In Belize, I am on a surf and turf vacation.  I will start off exploring some Mayan ruins in Central Belize.  Then I will head to the islands for some snorkeling, diving, kayaking, and some serious lounging in a hammock.  I am looking forward to going to my Belize as a tourist and not a researcher for once!

The final and longest leg of my journey will be to Davis, CA, a college town about 25 minutes southwest of Sacramento, and 130 minutes north of San Francisco.  I am renting a home here and will be hanging out with my Ph.D. advisor and lab colleagues.  While I am here, I hope that I can finish writing the last bits of my dissertation, as well as work on some future research projects.  But all work and no play is no fun, so I imagine that a trip or two to Sonoma or Napa Valley to do some wine tasting will probably happen.

So yeah, I think this is going to be a pretty amazing summer.  I hope you enjoy my journey.

My Travel Itinerary

  • 5.23 – 5.27: Miami, FL
  • 5.27 – 5.29: San Ignacio, Belize
  • 5.29 – 6.3: Caye Caulker, Belize
  • 6.3 – 6.4: Miami, FL
  • 6.4 – 8.10?: Davis, CA