Tag Archives: Travel

Vamos! let’s go to Ecuador!

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We are on our way to Quito, Ecuador!  We are currently stopped in Miami wondering what the upcoming week has in store for us from adjusting to the altitude to the impact we will make over the following week. Knowing that Quito is 9,400 feet above sea level what will the altitude difference be like compared to the 653 feet above sea level that Cleveland sits upon?

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Travels to France

Traveling to France was a dream come true for me. I had such a fabulous time that, the Lord willing, this will not be my last trip to the fantastic French land. I remember anticipating the trip, listening to French for Dummies and meeting a French tutor in preparation for the trip of a lifetime.  I have to say that the country of France did not disappoint.

The architecture of France is everywhere. As we traveled on the Metro, I marveled at the frescoes that covered the ceiling of the railcar. The magical scenes of horses and men displayed stories that a writer’s pen could compose a novel.  The ceiling was full of choreographed works of art of ancient times.

The Seine River was named appropriately for after traveling on the river cruise there were not many Parisian sights that I had not seen. The Eiffel Tower, the Musee D’Orsay and the Notre Dame Cathedral were the fabulous sights that I snapped with my camera as we journeyed down the river. The beauty of the bridges, the artistic figures of men, animals and the intricate detail of the objects were astounding.

The variety of cafes and restaurants gave me an opportunity to sample and to enjoy many different types of food. I was surprised by the variety of cakes that were available for breakfast.  The French people enjoy a number of sweet, delectable desserts from breakfast until dinner.  The hot chocolate at Angelina’s was the best that I have ever tasted.  The French culture has taught me to really delight in food.   It is important to take the time to taste, feel and savor the texture and flavor of the food.  In the United States, we are so busy that we live in a Styrofoam world, from to-go boxes to disposable coffee cups with lids; we neglect the importance of sitting down, taking a breath, enjoying our food and fellowshipping with others.

The visit to Claude Monet’s home and gardens was the most beautiful part of the trip.  I was reminded of special times that I spent with my grandma picking and planting flowers every year.  I savored the aroma of the many varieties of flowers. The pond was a body of still water that completed the peaceful scene.  As I think about Claude Monet, I try to imagine him as he was surrounded by mounds of flowers as he tried to decide which flowers to paint first.

Claude Monet’s home displayed his love for art with frame after frame of paintings and artwork covering every wall in the home.  The early twentieth century stove, the wash basin and other late nineteenth, early twentieth century items helped me to envision a time of simple living that included people spending quality time with each other and delighting in loving one another and not focusing on things the way that many people do today.  The many pieces of Japanese art surprised me.  As I was walking through the home, other visitors were discussing Monet’s fondness of Japanese art and how this art influenced his paintings.  Even though Monet had cataracts in his later years, he continued to paint and although the work was not as defined as his previous works, the outline of what he was painting is apparent and the colors are still vibrant.

The beauty of Monet’s home and garden added to the intriguing nature of France.  While the gardens represented life, the travel to the Omaha and Utah beaches were also a reminder of life.  Without the courage of the soldiers to come together on D-Day, I may not be here today.  If Hitler had continued his tyranny, my ancestors and many others who did not meet the narrow criteria of who was considered a perfect person would not have survived.  I am thankful to my grandfather and countless others who served in the military during World War II who fought for our freedom.  I learned a number of remarkable historical facts from our guide, Nigel, and from touring the museum.  If was fascinating viewing the items that were used eighty years ago such as clothing, supplies medications, weapons and phones, radios and telegraphs that were used to communicate.

The time in Paris included spending moments in a town with a vibrant night life.  Whether it was Saturday or Tuesday night, Parisians fill the streets and restaurants enjoying good food, good music and good company.  I would love to go back to France and spend a month touring the museums, walking along the river and breathing in the fresh air while standing on the countryside.  The trip to France has modified my thinking, increased my focus on what is important and helped me to stop and smell and appreciate the roses, to revel in the time spent with friends and to bask in the glory of nature that the Lord graces mankind with day after day.

April Braden, Student

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Reflections on France: Jewish-Christian Tour

Recently, twenty-three students, faculty, staff and friends of Ursuline College embarked on a Jewish-Christian tour of France. During their travels, the group experienced both the captivating atmosphere of France and the history of World War II. The experience in France left a lasting impression on everyone involved with the trip. Read their reflections below. To see more photos from their journey, click here

 

April Braden
The trip to France, namely Paris, was a dream come true for me.  I am named after the song “April in Paris”  and ironically, I was previously married to a man named Paris.  There were a number of enjoyable things that France offered from the Eiffel Tower, to Le Musee du Louvre, to the Seine Riverboat ride.  I would have to say that the opportunity to attend Claude Monet’s home and garden was my favorite.  The beauty of the variety of flowers and the aromatic scent that engulfed my sense of smell reminded me of the days spent with my grandmother looking at, selecting and planting multitudes of flowers every spring.  Although Claude Monet experienced problems with his sight in his latter years, the paintings that he created during the latter years were fabulous.  His ability to display an astounding creation on canvas, even with impaired eyesight, was not diminished, yet instead showed a God given talent that gave the world beauty and exquisite detail in many breathe taking works of art.

John
The trip to France this past Fall Break was one of the most amazing experiences I have ever had! The tour was truly unbelievable and I am so thankful for all of the different things we were able to experience.  It is hard to pin-point one thing on the trip that I liked the most, but Mont St. Michel and visiting the D-Day Beaches were on the top of my list. I am very thankful for Anne Lukas and everyone else that helped plan this trip!

Danielle
Thank you for the absolute amazing trip to France. It was a remarkable experience that I will never forget. I enjoyed each day of the journey. I have gained so much knowledge and saw unforgettable landmarks that many do not have the opportunity to experience. Although I loved every day’s planned events, my favorites were Mont St. Michel and Normandy.  I enjoyed staying at the hotel in the “village-like” town at Mont St. Michell. The food was exquisite and the view from my room was absolutely beautiful.  The beaches are astonishing. To be able to see the beaches, explore the bunkers, and stand on the battlefield is an honor. In addition, the museum in Normandy grabbed my attention and helped me gain insight of the war. This trip was by far the best experience I have ever had; and I am looking forward to the trip in 2015.

Gabrielle
Thank you so much for the wonderful trip to France. It was an amazing experience to visit the many places. Walking on the beaches of Normandy, and roaming through the bunkers that real soldiers used for shelter was an intriguing and fun-filled experience. I really hope to join you for your next trip to Italy and part of France.

Carol & Howard
This trip to France was a joy from beginning to end. We had a real welcome in Rouen from the kind and gracious University Hospital people. Mont St. Michel was storybook beautiful and a real treat. I think the best part was the day we spent in Normandy reliving D-Day. Our guide led us through the day with details about persons, places and events with great skill. I think I learned more about this piece of history in that one day than I did in my entire life. The cemetery visit was meaningful because of all we had learned before. Paris was Paris – busy, beautiful, full of history, wonderful food, music, shopping and memories!

Michael & Susie
Susan and I pooled all of our infrequent flier miles and joined the Ursuline trip to France. Random thoughts about our journey:

1) The French Government has made and I suspect will continue to make every effort to memorialize its positive track record during World War II. Not only did 75% of French Jewry survive the war, but there are more Jews living in France now than before the war. Most European Countries can’t make that claim.
2) Rouen was nearly left in ruin, but is thriving today.
3) If you want to pack in experiences throughout each day, Anne Lukas is the ticket.
4) No one on the trip knows the Ursuline fight song.
5) Because we walked at least five miles each day, I gained only two pounds in spite of eating more croissants than any other time in my life.

Je m’appelle Beurre Saltzman.

Holly and Riles 
What a fantastic journey! The program design was flawless and rich with history. Our tour guides were extremly knowledgeable, engaging and attended to every detail and accommodation needed. Every day’s activities were both educational and enlightening! We have gained such an appreciation for what happened in the past and brought us into the future. From the beautiful streets of Paris, to the breathtaking countryside of Normandy to the welcoming people of Rouen- we enjoyed it all. We also embraced the pain and suffering that people endured through such moving visits to the Internment camps and Shoah memorials- there are no words.

In particular, the best part of the entire trip were the members of our group! It was sincerely a privilege to have met such wonderful people who were all very caring and respectful to one another. Thanks to Anne’s vision and expertise, the trip far exceeded our expectations!

Pat Maskow Firem, Ph.D.
Our trip was an amazing combination of history, culture, spirituality, and health technology. Imagine climbing the stairs to a 1400 year old castle surrounded by water; climbing down into a 1200 Jewish yeshiva now underneath a courthouse, and walking on the very beaches on which our soldiers fought for a foothold during the WW II Normandy landings…all within a few days of each other. We participated in the liturgy in Notre Dame de Paris Cathedral, as well as in a bar mitzvah during a Sabbath service. The staff at the Rouen Hospital gave us a royal reception with hors d’ouvres that never seemed to end! All in all, we had the French experience of a lifetime. Thanks to Anne Lukas and all others who made this possible.

Abbey, Maggie, Danielle, Gabrielle , Danielle Lister-Sanchez and John Tonegato after the river boat cruise on the Seine River.

Photos from France: Jewish-Christian Tour

Currently, twenty-three students, faculty, staff and friends of Ursuline College are on a Jewish-Christian tour of France. Of the twenty-three travelers, eight are Jewish (five children of Holocaust survivors) and fifteen are Christian. Several have traveled before to Poland, Israel, Italy, France and Eastern Europe. You can follow the Ursuline College Jewish-Christian Tour of France through their photos.
Little Italy

College in CLE: Little Italy

Have you ever asked yourself, what is college in Cleveland like? The Marketing Department recently went on a road trip to find out. Our goal is to showcase Cleveland and the Northeast Ohio area – on a  student’s budget. During the trip, we planned to spend about $50 ($25 a piece for two people).

After Chagrin Falls, we headed to Little Italy, also known as Murray Hill or The Hill. Little Italy, Cleveland’s east side historic neighborhood has long been a hub for Italian American culture. Known for it’s food and art galleries, the area has maintained it’s heritage since 1895.

Check out our notes and photos from our afternoon in Little Italy!

3 PM – Fuel Coffee Bar

Fuel Coffee Bar was created with college students in mind. Stop in for the relaxing atmosphere to hang out with friends or set up on the study bar equipped with multiple power sources for all your electronic needs. 

3:30 PM – 5PM: Exploring Little Italy

10 Other Must Sees in Little Italy: 
1. Presti’s Bakery
2. Museum of Contemporary Art
3. Mama Santa’s
4. Tony Brush Park
5. Holy Rosary Church
6. The Little Italy Heritage Museum
7. Corbo’s Bakery
8. Juma Gallery
9.  La Trattoria
10. “Set in Stone” Walking Tour

Our next stop was dinner in Ohio City. Ciao!

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The “Ohio Collective” Presents in Oxford, England!

After London, the time for the conference and presentation at Mansfield College (University of Oxford, Oxford, U.K.) finally arrived. The paper presentations would be based off joint research project which was developed between Ursuline College and Tiffin University. The research examined the relationships between creativity and mental health/mental illness. Members of the project team who presented in Oxford included UC professor, DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D., UC Art Therapy and Counseling graduate students, Claire Whiteman, Mary Cassidy, & Rebecca Stanic, Tiffin University professor Jonathan Appel, Ph.D., and undergraduate behavioral sciences student Erin Snapp.

Oxford proved to be a relaxed and calm setting in contrast to the helter skelter (Beatles pun intended!) of London.

Both my husband and I agreed that there can be no place more inspiring to an academic than Oxford. The pastoral settings among the ancient gothic architecture –left us truly breathless. Just strolling in the surroundings that once held Lewis Carroll, Aldous Huxley, Oscar Wilde, Percy Bysshe Shelley, J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, T. S. Eliot, John Wycliffe, John Wesley, Stephen Hawking, Edwin Hubble, as well as heads of state (26 British prime ministers have attended Oxford) gave us the momentary illusion of being more enlightened!

We even made sure we even visited the famous “Eagle and the Child” public house—which was a gathering place for “The Inklings,” which was an Oxford writers’ group that included C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, Charles Williams and Hugo Dyson. It is from here that the writers read and discussed various works, including their manuscripts.

University of Oxford!

Although its exact date of origin is not completely know, there is evidence of teaching as far back as 1096 making it the oldest university in the English-speaking world! The University of Oxford is actually over 30 or so semi-autonomous colleges, which made for quite a diversity of place. (http://www.ox.ac.uk/visitors_friends/visiting_the_university/index.html)

The conference itself was held on the beautiful campus of Mansfield College (The main building was designed by architect Basil Champneys, and built between 1887-1890. It houses the main college library, the law library and the theology library). One could not think a more perfect setting for an intentionally intimate conference (just 25 or so papers out of 100 submitted were accepted).

International and Inter-Disciplinary

The conference was sponsored by Inter-Disciplinary.Net, which is “a forum for the exchange and interaction of ideas, research and points of view that bear on a wide range of issues of concern and interest in the contemporary world”. The organization goals are to” promote and sponsor inter- and multi-disciplinary encounters by bringing people together from differing contexts, disciplines, professions, and vocations, with the aim to engender and nurture engagements that cross the boundaries of intellectual work.”  This group also hopes that its “projects, conferences and publishing activities are creative and novel, and they evolve constantly as we seek out and foster emergentdevelopments.” http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/  Dr. Rob Fisher is the Network Founder and Network Leader. His great vision is apparent through the well run experience.

Conference participants were educators and scholars from various countries including, Scotland, UK, Poland, Germany, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, New Zealand, South Africa, Montreal, Italy, and the United States. There were psychiatrists, clinical psychologists, a feminist art historian, a medicalanthropologist, a philosopher, an attorney, several literature professors, and several additional professionals.

There was a collective feeling among us that the conference organizers were achieving their goals, and we were very impressed with the design and intent of the conference. It was truly fantastic to have cross national and cross-disciplinary discussions. It was very gratifying to see all the students treated as peers by both the organizers and attendees. The ideas and discussion (both formal and informal) were some of the best professional experiences we ever had. Special appreciate goes to conference facilitator Gonzalo Araoz—for his wit and support. He stood as a shining role model for us and our students.

We (Dr. Dohee Kim-Appel and husband Dr. Jonathan Appel) on the first day presented a paper entitled: “Non-Rational States of Consciousness: Understanding and Counseling ‘Madness’.”

The research team (which came to be dubbed “The Ohio Collective” at the conference) jointly presented the paper, “Creativity, Critique, and Cutting Edge: Creativity and Madness.” Each member of the team took a research area of the topic and presented on it– and opened the topic for further discussion. All the students presented with skill and grace. As our students presented extremely well — Jonathan and I were elated. The experience confirmed the reason why we wanted to be educators. Feedback from the participants regarding our students was overwhelming. We all seem to recognize that learning comes in many forms. I was proud to be part of the “Ohio Collective” in Oxford!

The blog post was written by DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D. Associate Professor for Art Therapy and Counseling at Ursuline College. 

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College in CLE: Chagrin Falls

Have you ever asked yourself, what is college in Cleveland like? The Marketing Department recently went on a road trip to find out. Our goal is to showcase Cleveland and the Northeast Ohio area – on a  student’s budget. During the trip, we planned to spend about $50 ($25 a piece for two people). Our first stop – Chagrin Falls.

The nostalgic and charming Chagrin Falls is about 10 minutes from the Ursuline College campus in Pepper Pike. You can walk around and view the waterfalls, shop and enjoy a variety of food while taking in a truly Americana atmosphere.

Check out our notes and photos from our morning in Chagrin Falls!

11 AM – Woke Up (we studied A LOT last night)

11:30 AM – Gas at Waterway on Lander Circle, a short drive from Ursuline College ($10)

11:45 AM – Breakfast at Washington Street Diner ($7.40 and $6.85, $1.50 tip each)

Home fries are exceptional, eight different kinds of toast, friendly and quick staff, breakfast is served all day, a lot for the price, options and great location, a mile or so outside of downtown Chagrin Falls

1 PM – 2:30 PM – exploring Downtown Chagrin Falls and the Polo Fields in Moreland Hills.

10 Other Must Sees in Chagrin Falls: 
1. The Popcorn Shop
2. Jeni’s Icecream
3. Rick’s Cafe
4. Fireside Bookshop
5. Flip Side
6. Lemon Falls
7. Greenville Inn
8. Chagrin Valley Little Theater
9. Chagrin Yoga Namaste!
10. Valley Art Center

Our next stop was lunch in Little Italy. Stay tuned!

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London Mary and Chris

On Our Way to Oxford, England!

A joint research project was developed between Ursuline College and Tiffin University. This project started in the spring and was designed to examine the relationships between creativity and mental health/mental illness. Members of the project team who attended the Oxford Conference included UC professor, DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D., UC Art Therapy and Counseling graduate students, Claire Whiteman, Mary Cassidy, & Rebecca Stanic, Tiffin University professor Jonathan Appel, Ph.D., and undergraduate behavioral sciences student Erin Snapp. The goals for the project were to expose students to the research experience, and present the research project(s) at national and international conference(s) and ultimately produce a publication.

When our paper proposals were accepted by the inter-disciplinary and international 6th Global Conference: Making Sense of Madness, we decided to invite students from both institutions. It was exhilarating to see the students’ motivation and excitement.  The Conference was scheduled from September 17th-19th at the Mansfield College (University of Oxford) in Oxford, England (http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/making-sense-of/madness/conference-programme-abstracts-and-papers/)

London!

On our way to participate and present at the 6th Global Conference – Making Sense of Madness in Oxford, most of us decided to independently visit London for the weekend. Students left the day before Jonathan and I left for the England. Arriving in London on a rainy Friday late evening, contributed some anxiety in a strange city – with fast driving cars, crowds, and narrowed streets. Crossing the street could be a challenge due to the opposite road direction!  Mornings in England appeared to start off sunny and beautiful with blue sky– but by afternoons it became unpredictable with gray, rainy weather being the norm.

We left our hotel when the weather was bright and decided to walk without a specific plan. We were misinformed on directions and ended up at the British museum! (http://www.britishmuseum.org/). The central gathering area in the British museum was similar to the Cleveland Museum of Art atrium. There were numerous exhibitions and the one about “living and dying” was an interesting one. The goal for the exhibition was to “explores how people everywhere deal with the tough realities of life and death. “These challenges are shared by all, but strategies to deal with them very from place to place, people to people” (Trust Gallery).

It was also natural for us to visit the national gallery (http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/) and experience sitting in front of the “Sunflowers” painting by the Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh. We then continued to explore London and decided to take Thames River cruise (http://www.riverthames.co.uk/history.htm). We were expecting to see only old wall of castles and historical buildings along the riverside. However, the river was also decorated with modern various shapes of glassed buildings. After the cruise, we walked through the St. James Park (http://www.royalparks.org.uk/parks/hyde_park/history.cfm) to Buckingham palace and eventually to Piccadilly Circus, and on to Chinatown and Soho neighborhoods. One of the highlight of the day was to run into one of the UC students (a member of our visiting research team), Mary Cassidy, in the middle of a busy London Street.

Sunday, early in the morning, we decided re-enact the Beatles Abbey Road Album cover crossing near Abbey Road studios in St. John’s Wood. Jonathan stated, “It took me 50 years to be here, but I now can scratch that off my ‘bucket list!’.” The weather was beautiful for our Beatles pilgrimage. Another highlight of the day was listening to the classical group, Brodsky Quartet, (http://www.brodskyquartet.co.uk/) at the King’s Place in London, while the rain picked up outside (now Ohio weather seems not so bad). Monday we left London for Oxford and ran into two other research team students (Rebecca Stanic and Erin Snapp) at the Victoria coach station. This reunited group then travelled together across into English countryside to historic Oxford.

More to Come!

The blog post was written by DoHee Kim-Appel, Ph.D. Associate Professor for Art Therapy and Counseling at Ursuline College.

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Amalfi Coast, Day 1 of UC Tour of Italy

As we touched down in Naples, everyone was exhausted from our long trip, but excited about the journey ahead. Everyone’s luggage made the long way and our next task was to find Enrica, our Odysseys Unlimited tour director. I can say we were all really happy to see her smiling face welcoming us. We boarded the bus and started on the next leg of the trip, an hour and half drive up the Amalfi Coast to our hotel. Well, to say the drive was not nerve wracking would be an undersatement, it was an on the edge of your seat kind of drive. The views were spectacular and our driver Domico was magnifico!

We all settled into the hotel and took in the sites, rooms overlooking the coast. We all met for dinner and took our first full group picture. Tomorrow off to Pompei, we can’t wait.

-Tiffany Mushrush Mentzer’03, Director of Alumnae Relations and Development Specialist

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And we are off…

The Tour of Italy trip for alumnae, students and friends of the College has begun. All 23 of us left from Cleveland at 12:30 PM with a flight to NJ. Now onto the long flight to Munich, Germany and then Naples, Italy. This group is truly excited for the wonderful trip in front of us. I have even been asked when’s the next trip and where to.

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– Tiffany Mushrush Mentzer ’03, Director of Alumnae Relations & Development Specialist