Tag Archives: Ursuline College

Health Policy Intensive course focuses on homelessness

The Breen School of Nursing offered a new course for undergraduate students this year – titled the Health Policy Intensive (HPI). The course was available for Junior level nursing students. Unlike regular courses, this intensive began just after finals ended, and included adventures around Cleveland and in Washington, D.C.

Comprised of eight students and two faculty members, the group learned what homelessness is like here in Cleveland. The group specifically worked with Bellefaire JCB to discover what homeless youths experience. In addition, the pre-trip portion of the intensive also included learning about life at the Lakeside Men’s Shelter.

The class traveled to Washington, D.C. for a four-day whirlwind trip that covered a wide range of informational activities and meetings. On the first day, the group began the trip with a discussion on public policy and how it relates to homelessness. The group was also able to meet with two legislative aids to discuss some of the public policy issues relating to homelessness. One of the students on the trip, Rachel Jalowiec, said, “I was shocked at how people paid such little attention to homelessness. When we were talking to the congressmen, they were throwing out these ideas, and from what we’d learned, we knew that they would never work.”

The second day of the trip was a tour of Catholic Charities USA in Alexandria, VA, where the class met with a public policy analyst and a lobbyist from Catholic Charities over a lunch meeting. The third day of the trip got more hands-on, with the class taking a tour of the National Institute of Health. There, they met with representatives from the nursing department as well as toured various wards. This gave the students the opportunity to see the nursing end of healthcare for those in difficult situations. In addition, the group met with Brian Carome, one of the leaders of an organization called Street Sense, which puts out a bi-weekly newspaper written by and for homeless people. This organization also helps to give the homeless marketable skills and employment by helping them contract for graphic art and other similar projects.

The HPI group at Christ House in Washington, D.C.

The HPI group at Christ House in Washington, D.C.

The final day of the trip was the one that hit the hardest. The group of students went to Christ House, which according to Mary Lind Crowe, one of the faculty members on the trip, is “a men’s only facility that accepts and provides care for homeless people that have chronic and/or debilitating illness once they are discharged from the hospital.”

About the trip to Christ House, Jalowiec said, “That was my favorite part, because it was more emotional than I thought it was going to be. The people were so kind, and they’ve lived hard lives.”

When asked about why it is important for students that are looking to go into healthcare, and especially nursing, to learn about homelessness, Crowe said, “The concept of homelessness is very relevant for nursing – we could encounter these people every day in our job and not realize it unless we pay attention to details, like if the address they give is a homeless shelter. It’s also key to remember that medical bills are the leading cause of bankruptcy, and that being in our care means that they and/or their families see what their going through as a financial burden.”

Jalowiec said that the HPI experience really changed her perspective on homelessness and healthcare. She stated that she learned that “whether it be mental illness or drug addiction, it’s important for the homeless to get healthcare without being judged. One of the reasons that they end up waiting so long to get healthcare, besides not being able to afford it, is that they are afraid of being judged.” She added that, “there are so many stereotypes with the homeless, and hearing about their pasts really helped us learn not to judge them.”

The HPI trip definitely made a lasting impact on all of those involved. Jalowiec stated that although she’d always wanted to make a difference in the world, “this trip has gotten [me] to look into things more. On our way to Christ House, I was discussing everything with my professors, and we wondered if there were any similar programs in Cleveland. This trip made me want to get my degree and look into working for a program like Christ House after I graduate. This class made me want to make more of a difference.”

Sustainability in Food Sources

By Kyle Jackson

Sustainability is something that I never really knew about or understood the importance of until I got to college. I wasn’t completely like that person who thinks global warming was a myth and that the environment just takes care of itself, but I definitely lacked an understanding of the pressing environmental issues that are at our doorstep. Since learning the basics about living responsibly and sustainably, I have made some efforts to live my life accordingly.

Growing up my family always recycled whenever it was available, but this was mostly out of convenience since a lot of times recycling is free and trash services cost money. In Michigan, almost all products in disposable plastic bottles and aluminum cans cost an additional ten cent deposit which can be retrieved by recycling them at the local grocery store. This in particular has served as an extremely effective method of cleaning up the environment because people are less likely to throw their cans and bottles away and definitely less likely to throw them out of their car while driving. Even if cans and bottles become litter, there is incentive for random strangers to pick them up and cash them in, which many do.

One other way in which I live a more sustainable life is by hunting and consuming the meat from the abundant whitetail deer population. As opposed to industrial farm raised beef, pork, or chicken, venison is a much leaner and cleaner meat to consume. Plus, the lack of effective natural predators in this region of the country has spawned massively overpopulated communities of deer. By humanely hunting and consuming their meat, it can both help control the deer population as well as keep money out of the pockets of the corporate farms responsible for so much animal abuse as well as meat contamination.

Plastic packaging and writing for sustainable change

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By Alyssa Adamowski, senior Ursuline College nursing student

Lately I’ve been noticing the amount of plastic and other materials used for packaging. Everything we buy comes in a package: food, electronics, clothes, and the majority of other products. Most of this plastic isn’t recyclable. According to the World Watch Institute, humans produce 1.3 billion tons of garbage per year, most of which ends up in landfills. Most of this packaging is unnecessary. But more importantly, why can’t all packaging just be recyclable? Why does my new printer need three pounds worth of packaging? Why does my toothpaste bottle need to come in a shiny unrecyclable box?

Over the past few months I’ve been collecting a list of everything I buy and seeing whether or not the packaging is recyclable. If it’s not I try to abstain from buying it, but I’ve come across problems. Toothpaste, for example, comes in a bottle and a box; is the box really necessary? The box doesn’t contribute to the sterility and cleanliness of the paste! But, I can’t live without toothpaste.

So, I wrote to Colgate and other companies asking them why their packaging isn’t recyclable. Not only have I written to corporations, I’ve written my congressmen asking them to pass a law requiring all businesses to only use recyclable packaging. Well, Colgate was the first to write me back! I found out that the plastic toothpaste bottle is recyclable but the cardboard box is not. They are working on making more of their products and packaging more environmentally friendly. They also sent me a coupon for my interest in their products!

I encourage you to write to your congressmen and tell them to vote for environmental change. Write to corporations and tell them you want them to revamp their products. The more people they hear from the more change we can make! Encourage your friends and family too!

Read more on this topic here.

#AllWeWantforChristmasIsYou

Dancing Around College with an iPod – Christmas Edition from Maggie Stark on Vimeo.

The Admission Team would like to dedicate this song to all of our prospective students! Watching this video is sure to make you fall in love with UC students & bring some holiday cheer to your day!

Spreading cheer: Ursuline serves women and children at Domestic Violence & Child Advocacy Center holiday event

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The Marketing Department represented the College last night at the Domestic Violence & Child Advocacy Center‘s annual Twinkle Shop, an event for families living at the agency’s shelter to shop for holiday gifts for one another, have a delicious meal and play like crazy. The Marketing gals took photos of each family with Santa and ran a craft table. Moms and their children decorated frames to display their new photos!

Thanks for having us, DVCAC! For more information about the Center, visit dvcac.org.

Be a Part of #GivingTuesday!

giving tuesday2Today, Ursuline College is joining a national day of generosity, #GivingTuesday. It is a day when you can make a big impact on helping students to achieve their educational and career goals by emphasizing the whole person and providing personalized attention within a liberal arts higher educational environment.

Give small – please consider donating $10 to your college and alma mater, Ursuline College. Donate here.

Progress. Campus continues to transform

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Ursuline College is excited to announce that the construction of two new campus buildings, the Center for the Creative and Healing Arts and Sciences and the athletic center, is on schedule to be completed and dedicated on June 10, 2015. This project is the College’s largest undertaking in more than 40 years.

The Center for the Creative and Healing Arts and Sciences will house the Art Therapy and Counseling Department and The Breen School of Nursing’s undergraduate and graduate programs. The building is comprised of 22,000 square feet of classrooms, labs, and conference and meeting space equipped with the latest educational technology.

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Witnesses to Christ, Witnesses for Justice: Sister Joanne Gross, O.S.U., J.D.

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Sr. Joanne Gross was awarded the Ursuline~St. John College Association’s Amadeus Rappe Award at the 2013 Reunion.

Written by Sr. Elaine Berkopec, O.S.U., Administrative Assistant to the Dean of Arts and Sciences

Sister Joanne Gross, O.S.U., holds a J.D. from Cleveland-Marshall College of Law and a Certificate in Nonprofit Management from CWRU’s Mandel Center. She currently serves as President of Catholic Community Connection, which promotes collaboration among the Catholic health care, senior living, social service and higher education ministries in the diocese of Cleveland. She also worked with Cuyahoga County as coordinator of domestic violence programming and funding, and served as legal services coordinator for a children’s mental health initiative.

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Witnesses to Christ, Witnesses for Justice: Sister Diane Therese Pinchot, O.S.U., M.F.A.

131010133236Sister Diane Therese Pinchot, O.S.U., M.F.A. is the artist behind the Bishop Pilla Learning Center’s stained glass window, overlooking Ursuline’s campus.

Written by Sr. Elaine Berkopec, O.S.U., Administrative Assistant to the Dean of Arts and Sciences

Sister Diane Therese Pinchot, O.S.U., M.F.A., has served as Professor in the Art Department at Ursuline College, where she has fostered and supported works of justice among students; she not only advocates for justice in Latin America by attending the annual commemoration of the martyrdom in El Salvador of the North American churchwomen, Dorothy Kazel, Maura Clarke, Ita Ford, and Jean Donovan.

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Witnesses to Christ, Witnesses for Justice: Sister Dorothy Kazel, O.S.U., M.A.

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In 1979, Sister Martha Owen, Kazel’s companion missioner, took the above photo of Kazel on the motorcycle she used to travel to villages along the southeast coast of El Salvador.

Written by Sr. Elaine Berkopec, O.S.U., Administrative Assistant to the Dean of Arts and Sciences

Ursuline Alumna, Sister Dorothy Kazel, O.S.U., M.A., served on the Cleveland Diocesan Mission Team in El Salvador, where she gave her life for the Salvadoran people. Before her work in El Salvador, she was a teacher, mentor, and counselor for high school girls for seven years.

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